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  • University Name: York University

York University

Department of Sociology

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

GS/SOCI 6200 3.00 (F) - M

GS/SPTH 6043 3.00 (F) - M

GS/CMCT 6113 3.00 (F) - M

Contemporary Topics in Social Theory

Rediscovering Marx


Fall 2017

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Class Time: Tuesday 14:30 - 17:30

Class Location: SC 220

Office Hours: Wednesday 18:00 - 19:00

Office Location: Ross Bldg. N833A

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Course Syllabus

Despite the predictions that consigned it to eternal oblivion, Karl Marx’s thought has returned to the limelight in recent years. Faced with a deep new crisis of capitalism, many are again looking to an author who in the past was often wrongly associated with the Soviet Union, and who was too hastily dismissed after 1989. After the waning of interest in the 1980s and the “conspiracy of silence” in the 1990s, new or republished editions of his work have become available almost everywhere. The literature dealing with Marx, which all but dried up twenty-five years ago, is showing signs of revival in many countries.

Marx’s writings are presently being published in German under the auspices of the Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA²) project, the critical historical edition of the complete works of Marx and Engels, which resumed serial publication in 1998. The purpose of this course is to reconstruct the stages of Marx’s thought in the light of the textual acquisitions of MEGA², and hence to provide a more exhaustive account of the formation of Marx’s conceptions than has previously been offered.

The great majority of researchers have considered only certain periods, often jumping straight from theEconomic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 to the Grundrisse (1857-58). The study of priceless manuscripts, and of interesting interim results, has remained the preserve of a narrow circle of scholars capable of reading the German-language volumes of MEGA². One of the aims of this course is to make these texts more widely known, and to debate on the genesis and unfinished character of Marx’s works.

Altogether, the Marx that emerges from this examination of his work in the areas of post-Hegelian philosophy, the materialist conception of history, scientific method, alienation and political thought at the time of the International Working Men’s Association is a thinker very different from the one presented for such a long time by his detractors as well as many ostensible followers.

If we bear in mind not only the well-known works, but also the manuscripts and notebooks of extracts in MEGA², the immensity and richness of Marx’s theoretical project appear in a clearer light. The notebooks of excerpts, and the recently published preparatory drafts of Capital, show the huge limitations of the “Marxist-Leninist” account – an ideology that often depicted Marx’s conception as something separate from the studies he conducted, as if it had been magically present in his head from birth – but also of the debate in Europe in the 1960s and 1970s. In fact, the participants in that debate could not consider the totality of Marx’s texts, and even some of these they treated as thoroughly finished works when that was far from being the case.

At a time when Marx’s ideas have finally been liberated from the chains of Soviet ideology, and when they are again being investigated for the sake of analysing the contemporary world, a more faithful account of the genesis of his thought may not be without important implications for the future – not only for Marx studies, but also for the re-founding of a critical thought that aims to transform the present.

Course Requirements

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars lasting 2 hours and 50 minutes. Attendance is obligatory and students are expected to participate actively in seminar discussion.

Presentation (+ Discussant) :

Classes will begin with a student presentation of 30 to 40 minutes. Avoid just reading a paper aloud and get your colleagues involved.

Each student is encouraged to discuss with the course director the main points of her/his presentation at least one week in advance. Presentations will be an essential part of our seminar. You will orientate the discussion toward them and will provide to your colleagues more extended insights concerning the topic of the week. That will be possible on the basis of the additional readings already indicated in the syllabus and/or of further texts that will be suggested by the course director.

In your presentation you should focus on Marx - and much less on secondary sources. After you present his texts and provide its background (a published book, a manuscript, etc.) in about 5 min., you should dedicate enough time (about 20 min.) to expose the most important concepts included in the readings. Then you can discuss the reception and the literature on the topic. Finally you will pose some open questions (at least 3/4) for the debate - to which you will respond in the end, expressing your own point of view.

Example of presentation (Class 2):

1. Tell your colleague what are the Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 and why/how were they written?

2. Present Marx's ideas on Alienated Labour, Private Property, Communism, etc.

3. Present the debate on the so-called 'young Marx'.

4. Pose questions.

5. Answer questions from your colleagues, chair the discussion, and provide an aswer to your questions.

In the second part of each class there will also be a 10 minutes contribution from a discussant. She/he should call the attention of other students to a few particular aspects of the topic of the week. The presenter and the discussant should cooperate before class, in order to avoid overlapping with the questions they will pose and with the problematics through which they will stimulate the discussion.

Final Paper Proposal:

The final paper proposal should be 3-4 pages (1.500 to 2.000 words) and include the following information:

- indication of the tentative title and of the sections in which the final paper will be divided;

- preliminary outline of the text;

- 5 keywords concerning the themes and the concepts to be addressed;

- a bibliography of at least 10 sources consulted;

Final paper proposals will be due, in hard copy and by email, and quickly presented in class, on November 7.

Please note that you cannot write the final paper on the same topic(s) you have done your presentation. Exceptions are possible, but very unlikely. In any case, the matter must be discussed in advance.

Final Paper:

Students are free to select their own final paper object among the topics listed below.

Marx on:

Capitalism - Communism - Democracy - Individual Freedom - Work - Proletariat

Class Struggle - Political Organization - Revolution - Ecology - Gender Equality

Nationalism and Ethnicity - Migration - Colonialism - War and International Relations

State - Globalization - Economic Crisis - Time - Materialistic Conception of History - Ideology - Art - Religion - Education - Technology and Science

Marx and/versus:

Hegel, Left Hegelians, Fourier, Owen, Saint-Simon, Smith, Ricardo, Malthus, Darwin, Proudhon, Lassalle, Bakunin, French Revolution, 1848, IWMA, Paris Commune, Russian Populism, India, Ireland, etc.

(Other topics can be proposed and discussed in advance with the course director)

The Final Paper, approved through the Final Paper Proposal, will be due by email no later than December 21. It should:

- be a maximum of 6.000 words, including notes and final references;

- be clearly structured and divided into at least 3 or 4 sections;

- have references from hard copy books, with the indication of page numbers (no references from the internet).

Access to Readings

The volume of M. Musto (ed.), Karl Marx's Grundrisse (Routledge, 2008) is available online at http://marcellomusto.org/images/BOOK-Musto-Marxs-Grundrisse.pdf and at Scott Library.

Karl Marx, Selected Writings (Oxford, 1977), and Marcello Musto (ed.), Workers Unite! (Bloomsbury, 2014) have been ordered for the bookstore.

Course Evaluation

Class Participation

20%

Presentations (+ Discussant)

30%

Final paper proposal

10%

Final paper

40%

Schedule of Classes and Readings

Sep 12 Introduction

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, 'Letter to his Father'

Additional Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, Chapters 1, 2 and maps, pp. 7-52 and 309-320.

Maximilien Rubel – Margaret Manale, Marx Without Myth: A Chronological Study of His Life and Work , Blackwell 1975

David McLellan, Karl Marx: His Life and Thought, Palgrave 2006

Hal Draper, The Marx-Engels Chronicle, Schoken Books 1985

Eric Hobsbawm, 'The Fortunes of Marx's and Engels' Writings'', in idem, ed., The History of Marxism, Volume 1: Marxism in Marx's day, Harvester 1982

Sep 19 The Encounter with Political Economy

With the participation of Prof. Mauro Buccheri (York University)


Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'The Rediscovery of Karl Marx', International Review of Social History, vol. 52, part 3, 2007: 477-498

Marcello Musto, 'Marx in Paris. Manuscripts and notebooks of 1844', Science & Society, Vol. 73, n. 3 (July 2009): 386-402

Karl Marx, Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts

Marcello Musto, 'The myth of the 'young Marx' in the interpretations of theEconomic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844', Critique, vol. 43 (2015), no. 2: 233-260.

Additional Readings:

Karl Löwith, From Hegel to Nietzsche, Columbia University Press, 1964 [1941] (Chapter 1)

Ernest Mandel, The Formation of the Economic Thought of Karl Marx, 1843 to Capital , New York: Monthly Review Press 1971

Louis Althusser, For Marx, Verso 2005 (Chapter 2: 'On the Young Marx')

Herbert Marcuse, Reason and Revolution: Hegel and the Rise of Social Theory, Humanity Books 1999 [1941]

Jean Hyppolite , Studies on Marx and Hegel, Harper & Row, 1969 [1955]

David McLellan, Marx before Marxism, Palgrave Macmillan 1970 (Chapters 1-3)

Sep 26 The Materialist Conception of History

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, 'Theses on Feuerbach'

Terrell Carver “The German Ideology Never Took Place”, History of Political Thought, Vol. 31 (1), pp. 107-127

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The German Ideology

Karl Marx, 'Letter to Annenkov'

Karl Marx, The Poverty of Philosophy

Additional Readings:

Terrell Carver - Daniel Blank (eds), Marx and Engels's "German Ideology" Manuscripts, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

Terrell Carver and Daniel Blank, A political history of the editions of Marx and Engels's "German ideology manuscripts", New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

Terrell Carver, The Postmodern Marx, Pennstate 1998, pp. 87-118

Oct 3 On Non-Anticapitalist Socialisms

Required Readings:

Carl Landauer, European Socialism, (Chapter I: 'The Three Anticapitalistic Movement', sections 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) pp. 21-59

Eric Hobsbawm, How to Change the World: Tales of Marx and Marxism (chapter 2: 'Marx, Engels and Pre-Marxian socialism')

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

Karl Marx, 'Wage-Labour and Capital'

Karl Marx, 'Speech on Free Trade'

Friedrich Engels, Socialism: Utopian and Scientific

Additional Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, “Introduction to The Communist Manifesto. A Modern Edition”, London: Verso, 1998, pp. 3-29.

George D.H. Cole, Socialist Thought, Volume I: The Forerunners 1789-1850, (Chapters IV: 'Saint-Simon', VI: 'Fourier and Fourierism', IX: 'Owen and Owenism - Earlier Phases'), pp. 37-50, 62-74 and 86-101

Vincent Geoghegan, Utopianism and Marxism, Peter Lang 2008 [1987]

Gregory Claeys, “Socialism and Utopia”, in Roland Schaer, Gregory Claeys, and Lyman Tower Sargent (eds), Utopia : The Search for the Ideal Society in the Western World, New York: The New York Public Library - Oxford University Press 2000, pp. 206–40.

Pamela Pilbeam, French Socialists before Marx: Workers, Women, and the Social Question in France . Teddington: Acumen 2000.

Oct 10 1848 and after

With the participation of Prof. Terrell Carver (University of Bristol)

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, The Class Struggle in France

Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte

Additional Readings:

Hal Draper, Karl Marx's Theory of Revolution, Vol. 1, ch. 15.

Mark Cowling and James Martin (eds.), Marx's 'Eighteenth Brumaire': (post)modern interpretations, London: Pluto Press, 2002.

Oct 17 Crisis and Uprisings: Journalism for the New-York Tribune

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, 'Preface to A Critique of Political Economy'

Marcello Musto, 'The Formation of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: From the Studies of 1843 to the Grundrisse', Socialism & Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (July 2010), pp. 66-100

Michael Krätke, 'The First World Economic Crisis: Marx as an Economic Journalist', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 162-168

Michael Krätke, 'Marx's 'books of crisis' of 1857-8', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, Routledge 2008, pp. 169-175

Karl Marx, 'Journalism of the 1850s'

Karl Marx, 5 articles for the New-York Tribune:

'Revolution in China and Europe' from MECW 12; 'The Economic Crisis in Europe', 'The Trade Crisis in England', 'The Financial Crisis in Europe' from MECW 15; and 'British Commerce and Finance' from MECW 16

Plus 5 other articles, by choice, among those listed below:

'Pauperism and Free Trade – The Approaching Commercial Crisis' from MECW 11; 'Revolution in China and Europe' and 'Political Movements – Scarcity of Bread in Europe' from MECW 12; 'The Commercial Crisis in Britain' from MECW 13; 'The Crisis in England' from MECW 14; 'The French Crédit Mobilier' (I, II and III), 'The Monetary Crisis in Europe', 'The Causes of the Monetary Crisis in Europe', 'The European Crisis', 'The New French Bank Act', 'The Bank Act of 1844 and the Monetary Crisis in England', 'The Crisis in Europe', 'The French Crisis', 'The Economic Crisis in France' and 'The Financial State of France' from MECW 15; 'The English Bank Act of 1844' and 'Commercial Crises and Currency in Britain' from MECW 16

Karl Marx, 'Letters 1848-1857'

Additional Readings:

Karl Marx, Dispatches for the New York Tribune: Selected Journalism of Karl Marx , New York: Penguin, 2007

Aijaz Ahmad, ‘Marx on India: A Clarification’, in In Theory: Classes, Nations, Literatures. London: Verso 1992, pp. 221-42.

Irfan Habib, ‘Marx’s Perception of India’, in Iqbal Husain (ed.), Karl Marx, on India. New Delhi: Tulika Books 2006, pp. xix-liv.

Prabhat Patnaik, ‘Appreciation: The Other Marx’,in Iqbal Husain (ed.),Karl Marx, on India. New Delhi: Tulika Books 2006, pp. lv-lxviii.

Simon Clarke, Marx’s Theory of Crisis, London: Palgrave 1994.

Oct 24 The Grundrisse

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'History, Production and Method in the 1857 Introduction', in idem, ed., Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 3-32

Karl Marx, Grundrisse

John Bellamy Foster, Marx's Grundrisse and the Ecological Contradictions of Capitalism', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 93-106

Additional Readings:

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Roman Rosdolsky, The Making of Marx’s Capital, Pluto 1977 (Chapters XXVIII and XXIX)

Iring Fetscher, 'Emancipated Individuals in an Emancipated Society: Marx's Sketch of Post-Capitalist Society in the Grundrisse', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 107-119

Eric Hobsbawm, Introduction to Karl Marx, Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations, International Publishers 1965, pp. 9-65

Ellen Meiksins Wood, Historical Materialism in 'Forms Which Precede Capitalist Production' , in Marcello Musto, ed., Karl Marx's Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 79-92

Moishe Postone, "Rethinking Capital in Light of the Grundrisse", in M. Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy , pp. 120-137.

Oct 31 Capital I, Unpublished Ch. VI: The Critique of Capitalist Alienation

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, “Revisiting Marx’s Concept of Alienation”, Socialism and Democracy, vol. 24, n. 3 (November 2010): 79-101.

Karl Marx, Theories of Surplus Value (only from 429 to 432)

Karl Marx, 'Results of the Immediate Process of Production'

Karl Marx, 'The Fetishism of Commodities' (pp. 458-472 from Capital, Vol. I)

Karl Marx, 'Letters 1858-1868'

Additional Readings:

Ernest Mandel, 'Appendix: Results of the Immediate Process of Production: Introduction', in Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I, pp. 943-947

Isaak Illich Rubin, Essays on Marx’s Theory of Value, Black & Red 1972

Michael Lebowitz, Beyond Capital, Palgrave 2003 (Chapter 3: 'The Missing Book on Wage-Labour'), pp. 27-50

Kevin Anderson, Marx at the Margins, University of Chicago Press 2010 (Chapter 5: From the Grundrisse to Capital: Multilinear Themes), pp. 151-195

Nov 7 Primitive Accumulation, Capitalism and Surplus Value

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, A. From Volume I

Additional Readings:

Ernest Mandel, 'Introduction', in Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I, pp. 11-86

David Harvey, The Limits to Capital, London: Verso 2006 (Chapter 1: 'Commodities, Values and Class Relation'), pp. 1-38

Ellen Meiksins Wood, Democracy Against Capitalism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1995 ('Introduction' and Chapter 1: 'The Separation of the 'Economic' and the 'Political' in Capitalism), pp. 1-48

Enrique Dussel, Towards an unknown Marx: A Commentary on the Manuscritps of 1861-1863, Routledge 2001

Ernest Mandel, 'Marx, Karl Heinrich', in John Eatwell - Murray Milgate - Peter Newman (eds), The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics, Volume 3, pp. 367-383

Nov 14 The International

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, “Introduction”, in Id. (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Editor), London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 1-30.

Various Authors, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Parts 1, 2, 4, 11, and 12).

Karl Marx, 'Letters 1863-1881'

Additional Readings:

Fernbach, David, ‘Introduction' in Karl Marx, The First International and After: Political Writings (vol. 3), London: Verso, 2010, pp. 9-71.

Julius Braunthal, History of the International, New York: Praeger, 1967.

Julian P. W. Archer, The First International in France, 1864-1872: Its Origins, Theories, and Impact , Lanham/New York/Oxford: University Press of America, 1997.

Nov 21 The Paris Commune and the Conflict with the Autonomists

Marcello Musto, 'Introduction', in Id. (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later , pp. 31-68.

Various Authors, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Parts 6, 7, 9, 10, and 13).

Karl Marx, On Bakunin's Statism and Anarchy

Additional Materials:

Donny Gluckstein, The Paris Commune: A Revolution in Democracy, Chapter 1: "The Commune's Achievements", pp. 1-42.

Kristin Ross, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune, London: Verso, 2015.

Prosper Olivier Lissagaray, History of the Paris Commune of 1871 [1876], London: Verso.

Nov 28 The Last Studies

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme

Marcello Musto, 'The Researches of the Late Marx: Anthropology, Colonialism, and Revolution' (forthcoming 2018)

Karl Marx, 'Letter to Mickhailovsky'

Lawrence Krader, 'Introduction', in Karl Marx,The Ethnological Notebooks of Karl Marx. Assen: Van Gorcum, 1972, pp. 1-43.

Karl Marx, 'Letter (and Drafts) to Vera Zasulich'

Karl Marx, 'Preface to The Communist Manifesto'

Additional Readings:

Daniel Bensaid, Marx for Our Times, London: Verso 2002

Kevin Anderson, Marx at the Margins, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 2010 (Chapter 5: Late Writings on Non-Western and Precapitalist Societies), pp. 196-236

February 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

Department of Sociology

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

GS/SOCI 6711 3.0 (W) - M

Social Movements

Winter 2017

Course Syllabus

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Class Time: Thursday 14:30 - 17:30

Class Location: Ross Bldg. S 501

Office Hours: Tuesday 17:30 - 18:30 (or by appointment)

Office Location: Ross Bldg. N 833A

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Unit Description


This course deals with the developments of some of the most significant international social movements from the end of Ancien Régime to the fall of Berlin Wall (1789-1989). These include social movements that were formed around the French Revolution, the Revolutions of 1848, the Paris Commune, the birth of Soviet Union, the Chinese Revolution, the anticolonialist process in Asia, Africa and Latin America, the protests of 1968, as well as Socialist Feminism. These movements will be critically analysed, both in terms of history of ideas and of their major socio-political characteristics.

Course Requirements

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars. Attendance is strongly recommended and students are expected to participate actively in class discussion.

Presentation:

Classes will begin with a student presentation of 30 to 40 minutes. Avoid just reading a paper aloud and get your colleagues involved.

Each student is encouraged to discuss with the course director the main points of her/his presentation at least one week in advance. Presentations will be an essential part of our seminar. You will orientate the discussion toward them and will provide to your colleagues more extended insights concerning the topic of the week. That will be possible on the basis of the additional readings already indicated in the syllabus and/or of further texts that will be suggested by the course director.

In your presentation, you should avoid devoting too much time to the assigned readings. You will only highlight their main points (in 5 to 10 min.) and pose some open questions (at least 3/4) for the debate - to which you will respond in the end, expressing your own point of view.

The most important part of the presentation (15 to 20 min.) should be dedicated to an exposition of the main characteristics of social movement in question: main achievements, class composition, role of women, socio-historical context, main ideas, political organization, etc.

In the second part of each class there will also be a 10 minutes contribution from a discussant. She/he should call the attention of other students to a few particular aspects of the topic of the week, including the influence (or reception, in case of theory) in the world. The presenter and the discussant should cooperate before class, in order to avoid overlapping with the questions they will pose and with the problematics through which they will stimulate the discussion.

Final Paper Proposal:

Students are free to propose their own final paper topic, but it must be related to one or more social movements, as well as key issues, discussed during the seminar. The final paper proposal should be 3-4 pages (1.500 to 2.000 words) and include the following information:

- indication of the tentative title and of the sections in which the writing will be divided;

- preliminary outline of the text;

- 5 keywords concerning the themes and the concepts to be addressed;

- a bibliography of at least 10 sources consulted;

Final paper proposals will be due, in hard copy and by email, on March 2.

Please note that you cannot write the final paper on the same author(s) you have done your presentation. Exceptions are possible, but unlikely. In any case, the matter must be discussed in advance.

Final Paper:

The Final Paper, approved through the Final Paper Proposal, will be due in hard copy and by email no later than April 30. It should:

- be a maximum of 6.000 words, including notes and final references;

- be clearly structured and divided into at least 3 or 4 sections;

- have references from hard copy books, with the indication of page numbers (no references from the internet).

Course Evaluation

Class Participation

20%

Presentation

20%

Final Paper Proposal

10%

Final Paper

50%


Schedule of Classes and Readings

Week 1 – 12 January: French Revolution

With the participation of Prof. Terrell Carver (University of Bristol)

Recommended Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, Chapters 1, 2 and maps, pp. 7-52 and 309-320.

https://libcom.org/files/Eric%20Hobsbawm%20-%20Age%20Of%20Revolution%201789%20-1848.pdf

Week 2 – 19 January: From 1789 to the Revolutions of 1848

With the participation of Prof. George Comninel (York University)

Required Readings:

George Rudé, The Crowd in the French Revolution, in particular Part III: "The Anatomy of the Revolutionary Crowd", pp. 178-239.

Carl Landauer, European Socialism, Chapter I: "The Three Anticapitalistic Movements", (sections 1-5), Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1959, pp. 21-59.

William Sewell, Work & Revolution in France, Cambridge: CUP, 1980, Chapter 9: "The July Revolution and the Emergence of Class Consciousness", pp. 194-218; and Chapter 11: "The Revolution of 1848", pp. 243-276.

Additional Readings:

Roger Magraw, "Socialism, Syndicalism and French Labour before 1914", in Dick Geary, Labour and Socialist Movements in Europe before 1914, New York: Berg, 1989, pp. 48-100.

George D. H. Cole's, A History of Socialist Thought, Vol. I (The Forerunners 1789-1850) , Chapter I: "The Great French Revolution and the Conspiracy of Gracchus Babeuf", pp. 11-22.

https://libcom.org/library/history-socialist-thought-volume-i-forerunners-1789-1850

Pamela Pilbeam, French Socialists before Marx: Workers, Women, and the Social Question in France . Teddington: Acumen 2000, in particular Chapter 8: "Worker Associations before 1848".

Eric Hazan, A History of the Barricade, London: Verso, 2015.

Week 3 – 26 January: Paris Commune

Required Readings:

Donny Gluckstein, The Paris Commune: A Revolution in Democracy, Chapter 1: "The Commune's Achievements", pp. 1-42.

https://books.google.ie/books?id=fGrR78ZkBJcC&printsec=frontcover&hl=it&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Karl Marx, The Civil War in France, in Marcello Musto (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Chapters 46 and 65).

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Kristin Ross, Communal Luxury: The Political Imaginary of the Paris Commune, London: Verso, 2015.

Additional Materials:

Peter Watkins, La commune (Paris, 1871), France, 345 min.

Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KIvQ1nUdIs&ab_channel=Chve

Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rI-UFKiOvg&ab_channel=Chve

Prosper Olivier Lissagaray, History of the Paris Commune of 1871 [1876], London: Verso.

https://www.marxists.org/history/france/archive/lissagaray/

Marcello Musto, “Introduction”, in Id. (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Editor), London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 1-68.

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Week 4 – 2 February: The Narodniks and Populism in Russia

Required Readings:

Vera Zasulich - Karl Marx, "Letters on Social Relations in Russia"

https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1881/zasulich/

Franco Venturi , Roots Of Revolution: A History of the Populist and Socialist Movements in Nineteenth Century Russia , New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1960, in particular chapters 7: "The Peasant Movement", 8: "The Student Movement", 9: "The First Groups", pp. 204-252, Chapter 18: "The Movement 'Go to the People'", pp. 469-506, Chapter 19: "The Working Class Movement", pp. 507-558.

https://ia800304.us.archive.org/33/items/rootsofrevolutio008262mbp/rootsofrevolutio008262mbp.pdf

Andrzey Walichi, The Controversy over Capitalism, Oxford: OUP, 1969.

Additional Readings:

Nikolai Chernyshevsky, What Is to Be Done?, Cornell: Cornell University Press , 1989.

Teodor Shanin (Ed.), Late Marx and the Russian Road, Marx and the ‘peripheries of capitalism’ , New Tork: Monthy Reivew Press, 1983.

Lenin, The Heritage We Renounce

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1897/dec/31c.htm

James H. Billington, Mikhailovsky and Russian populism , Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1958.

Richard Wortman, The crisis of Russian populism , London: CUP, 1967.

Arthur P. Mendel, Dilemmas of progress in tsarist Russia: Legal Marxism and legal Populism , Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1961.

Andrzej Walicki, A History of Russian Thought: From the Enlightenment to Marxism, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1979.

Week 5 – 9 February: Russian Revolution I: the Soviets

Required Readings:

Maurice Brinton, The Bolsheviks and Workers' Control: The State and Counter-Revolution

https://www.marxists.org/archive/brinton/1970/workers-control/

Rex A. Wade, The Russian Revolution, 1917, Cambridge: CUP, 2005, Chapter 4: "The Aspirations of Russian Society", pp. 88-129, Chapter 5 "The Peasants and the Purpose of Revolution", pp. 129-145.

Lenin, All the Power to the Soviets!

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/jul/18.htm

Additional Readings:

Victor Serge, Year One of the Russian Revolution, in particular Chapter 1: "From Serfdom to Proletarian Revolution", Chapter 2: "The Insurrection of 25 October 1917", and Chapter 3: "The Urban Middle Classes against the Proletariat".

https://www.marxists.org/archive/serge/1930/year-one/index.htm

Paul H. Avrich, "The Bolshevik Revolution and Workers' Control in Russian Industry", in Slavic Review, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Mar., 1963), pp. 47-63.

Lenin, State and Revolution (1918)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/works/1917/staterev/

Sheila Fitzpatrick, The Russian Revolution, 1917-1932, Oxford: OUP, 1984.

John Reed, Ten Days that Shook the World

https://www.marxists.org/archive/reed/1919/10days/10days/index.htm

Tamás Krausz, Reconstructing Lenin, New York: Monthly Review, 2015.

Week 6 – 16 February: Russian Revolution II: Workers' Control or Party-State Rule?

Required Readings:

Lynne Viola (Ed.), Contending with Stalinism: Soviet Power and Popular Resistance in the 1930s , Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2002, pp. 1-108.

Additional Readings:

E. H. Carr, The Bolshevik Revolution (3 voll.), New York: Penguin, 1950.

Ronald Suny, The Soviet Experiment, Oxford: OUP, 2011.

Paul Mattick, Workers’ Control (1967), Section 3.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1967/workers-control.htm

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Week 7 – 2 March: Councils Movement

Required Readings:

Pierre Broué, The German Revolution, 1917-1923, London: Merlin Press, 2006, Chapter 1: 1-10, Chapter 7: pp. 89-110, Chapter 8: 129-155.

Gabriel Kuhn (Ed.), All the Power to the Councils: A Documentary History of the German Revolution of 1918-1919 , Oakland: PM Press, 2012, in particular: Ernst Daeumig, "The Council Idea and Its Realization", pp. 51-58.

https://libcom.org/files/Allpower%20to%20the%20councils.pdf

Rosa Luxemburg, The Mass Strike, the Political Party and the Trade Unions (1906) (sections 4 and 6-8).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1906/mass-strike/

Antonio Gramsci, "The Turin factory council movement" (1921).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/gramsci/1921/03/turin_councils.htm

Additional Readings:

Ralf Hoffrogge, Working-Class Politics in the German Revolution, Leiden: Brill, 2014.

Gwyn A. Williams, Proletarian Order: Antonio Gramsci, Factory Councils and the Origins of Communism in Italy, 1911-1921 , London: PLuto Press, 1975.

Marcel van der Linden, "On Council Communism", in Historical Materialism, vol. 12 (2004), n. 4.

https://www.marxists.org/subject/left-wing/2004/council-communism.htm

Anton Pannekoek, Workers' Councils (1946)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/pannekoe/1947/workers-councils.htm

Rosa Luxemburg, "The Socialisation of Society" (1918).

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1918/12/20.htm

Lelio Basso, Rosa Luxemburg: A Reappraisal, London: Deutsch 1975.

Paul Mattick, Anti-Bolshevik Communism, London: Merlin 1978.

https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1978/introduction.htm

Week 8 – 9 March: Spanish Revolution

Required Readings:

Eddie Conlon, The Spanish Civil War: Anarchism in Action, Workers' Solidarity Movement, 1986 (extracts).

https://libcom.org/history/1936-1939-the-spanish-civil-war-and-revolution

Pierre Broue - Emile Temime, The Revolution and the Civil War in Spain , Chapter 4: "Pronunciamiento and Revolution", pp. 93-120, Chapter 5: "The Revolutionary Gains", pp. 121-149.

Deirdre Hogan, Industrial Collectivisation During the Spanish Revolution

http://struggle.ws/wsm/rbr/rbr7/spain.html

Lose Peirats, The CNT in the Spanish Revolution, Volume 1, Chapter 8: "Spain in flames".

https://libcom.org/files/The%20CNT%20in%20the%20Spanish%20Revoluti%20-%20Jose%20Peirats.pdf

Karl Korsch, Collectivization in Spain (1939)

https://www.marxists.org/archive/korsch/1939/collectivization.htm

Additional Materials:

Ken Loach, Land and Freedom, UK - Spain, 109 min.

https://vimeo.com/17190850

Gaston Leval, Collectives in the Spanish revolution

https://libcom.org/library/collectives-spanish-revolution-gaston-leval

Michael Seidman, Republic of Egos: A Social History of the Spanish Civil War

https://libcom.org/files/Republic_of_Egos.pdf

Lose Peirats, Anarchists In The Spanish Revolution

https://libcom.org/files/Peirats%20J.%20Anarchists%20in%20the%20Spanish%20Revolution.pdf

George Orwell, Homage to Catalonia

Week 9 – 16 March: Chinese Communist Revolution

Required Readings:

TBA

Additional Readings:

Edward Friedman, Backward Toward Revolution, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1974.

Jean Chesneaux, Peasant Revolts in China, 1840-1949, pp. 101-120, 150-166.

Harold R. Isaacs, The Tragedy of the Chinese Revolution (1938).

https://www.marxists.org/history/etol/writers/isaacs/1938/tcr/

Week 10 – 23 March: Anti-colonial Movements: The Case of Algeria

Required Readings:

Alistair Horne, A savage war of peace: Algeria, 1954-1962 , London: Macmillan, 1977, Chapter 9: "The Battle of Algiers", pp. 183-207.

Joan Gillespie, Algeria: Rebellion and Revolution, Westport: Greenwood Press, 1960, Chapter 9: "The Revolutionary Years", pp. 112-179.

Franz Fanon, A Dying Colonialism, New York: Grove Press, 1959.

http://abahlali.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Frantz-Fanon-A-Dying-Colonialism.pdf

Additional Materials:

Gillo Pontecorvo, The Battle of Algiers, Italy - Algeria, 120 min.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-lWF100yTM&ab_channel=StephenBoyd

Ernesto Che Guevara, Message to the Tricontinental (1967)

Week 11 – 30 March: Paris 1968: We Want Everything!

Required Readings:

1968: - a chronology of events in France and internationally

https://libcom.org/history/articles/france-1968

Daniel Singer, Prelude to Revolution (1970), Cambridge: South End Press, pp. 115-151.

Vv. Aa., May-June 1968 - A Situation Lacking in Workers' Autonomy

https://libcom.org/library/may-june-1968-absence-workers-autonomy

Additional Materials:

Alain Schnapp - Pierre Vidal-Naquet, The French Student Uprising, November 1967-June 1968: An Analytical Record , Boston: Beacon Press, 1971, in particular pp. 147-240 and 325-372.

Paris 1968 posters

https://libcom.org/gallery/paris-68-posters

Christine Fauré, Mai 68, Paris: Gallimard, 1998.

Michael M. Seidman, The Imaginary Revolution: Parisian Students and Workers in 1968, New York: Berghahn Books, Chap. 1 "Sex, Drugs, and Revolution", pp. 17-52.

https://books.google.ca/books?id=3ZaXdwPyblcC&printsec=frontcover&hl=it&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false

Obsolete communism: The left wing alternative - Daniel and Gabriel Cohn-Bendit

https://libcom.org/files/Obsolete%20Communism%20-%20The%20left-wing%20alternative%20-%20Daniel%20Cohn-Bendit%20&%20Gabriel%20Cohn-Bendit.pdf

Tom Nairn and Angelo Quattrocchi, The Beginning of the End: France, May 1968, London: Verso.

General Strike: France 1968 - A factory by factory account

https://libcom.org/library/general-strike-france-1968-factory-factory-account

M. Klimke - J. Scharloth (Eds.), 1968 in Europe: A History of Protest and Activism, 1956–1977, London: Palgrave, 2008.

Kristin Ross, May '68 and Its Afterlives, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

http://angg.twu.net/tmp/ross__may_68_and_its_afterlives.pdf

Tariq Ali - Susan Watkins (Eds), 1968: Marching in the Streets

Margaret Atack, May 68 in French Fiction & Film, Oxford: OUP, 1999.

Week 12 – 6 April: The Personal is Political: Women's Liberation

Required Readings:

Carol Giardina, Freedom for women: forging the Women's Liberation Movement, 1953-1970 , Gainesville, Fla.: University Press of Florida, 2010, in particular Chapter 9: "Making the Women's Liberation Movement", pp. 174-192.

https://www.library.yorku.ca/find/Record/3062725 [Electronic resource]

Another Reading TBA.

Carol Hanisch, "The Personal is Political" (1969)

http://www.carolhanisch.org/CHwritings/PIP.html

Additional Readings:

Judith Evans, Feminist Theory Today: an Introduction to Second-Wave Feminism, Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 1995.

Robin Morgan (ed.), Sisterhood Is Powerful: An Anthology of Writings from the Women's Liberation Movement.

Shulamith Firestone, The Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution

Nancy Holmstrom, The Socialist Feminist Project: A Contemporary Reader in Theory and Politics, New York: Monthly Review Press 2002, (in particular: Nancy MacLean, "The Hidden History of Affirmative Action: Working Women’s Struggles in the 1970s and the Gender of Class").

Luce Irigaray, Speculum of the Other Woman [1974] (excerpts); and This Sex Which Is Not One [1977] (Chapter 8 "Women on the Market" and excerpts).

Z. Eisenstein (ed.), Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism, New York: Monthly Review Press 1979.

Stephanie Gilmore (Ed.), Feminist coalitions: historical perspectives on second-wave feminism in the United States , Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2008.

February 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

Department of Sociology

Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies

GS/SOCI 6190 3.0 (W) - M

Selected Topics in

Classical and Contemporary Theory

Winter 2016

Course Syllabus

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Class Time: Thursday 11:30 - 14:30

Class Location: Itinerant

Office Location: Ross Bldg. N833A

Office Hours: Tuesday 17:00 - 18:00 (or by appointment)

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Unit Description



This course deals with the development of sociological theory in the major foundational thinkers of the 19th and early 20th century. Much of classical sociological theory was focussed upon growing awareness of society, as such, being the subject of profound change. Central questions addressed by its main authors were “What is the nature of the society emerging in 19th century Europe?” and “What is its significance with respect to the development of humanity?” Differences of opinion and profound debate have been characteristic of sociological theory, and have widely been recognized as contributing to its development.

Course Requirements

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars. Attendance is strongly recommended and students are expected to participate actively in class discussion.

Presentation:

Classes will begin with a student presentation of 30 to 40 minutes. If possible, avoid just reading a paper aloud and try get your colleagues involved.

Each student has to meet with the course director the week before her/his presentation (or two weeks before, if necessary). During the conversation with the course director you will agree upon the main points of the presentation, therefore please come prepared to the meeting, with at least a list of main topics you would like to cover.

Presentations will be an essential part of our seminar. You will orientate the discussion toward them and will provide to your colleagues more extended insights concerning the author(s) and the theories of the week. That will be possible on the basis of the additional readings already indicated in the syllabus and/or of further texts that will be suggested by the course director.

In your presentation, you should avoid devoting too much time to the assigned readings. You will only highlight their main points (in 5 to 10 min.) and pose some open questions (at least 3/4) for the debate - to which you will respond in the end, expressing your own point of view.

The most important part of the presentation (10 to 15 min.) should be dedicated to an exposition of the vision of society conceived by the author you are presenting, and in particular her/his conception of its economic, political and social organization.

The other main issues on which to concentrate on are: the socio-historical context in which the author(s) developed her/his ideas (5 min.), her/his intellectual biography (5 min.), philological information about the writings we have been reading (2 min), and, finally, the subsequent reception and dissemination of her/his ideas (5 min.).

In the second part of each class there will also be a 10 minutes contribution from a discussant. She/he should call the attention of other students to a few particular aspects of the work of the author in question, e.g., a particular concept, the reception of her/his work in a specific country, period or school of thought, etc.

The presenter and the discussant should cooperate before class, in order to avoid overlapping with the questions they will pose and with the problematics through which they will stimulate discussion.

Final Paper Proposal:

Students are free to propose their own final paper topic, but it must be related to one or more authors, as well as key issues, discussed during the seminar. The final paper proposal should be 3-4 pages (1.500 to 2.000 words) and include the following information:

- indication of the tentative title and of the sections in which the writing will be divided;

- preliminary outline of the text;

- 5 keywords concerning the themes and the concepts to be addressed;

- a bibliography of at least 10 sources consulted;

Final paper proposals will be due, in hard copy and by email, on March 3.

Please note that you cannot write the final paper on the same author(s) you have done your presentation. Exceptions are possible, but must be discussed in advance.

Final Paper:

The Final Paper, approved through the Final Paper Proposal, will be due in hard copy and by email no later than May 9. It should:

- be a maximum of 6.000 words, including notes and final references;

- be clearly structured and divided into at least 3 or 4 sections;

- have references from hard copy books, with the indication of page numbers (no references from the internet).

Course Evaluation

Class Participation

20%

Presentation

20%

Final Paper Proposal

10%

Final Paper

50%

Schedule of Classes and Readings

Week 1 – 7 January: Industrialism, Positivism and the Birth of Sociology

Required Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, The Age of Revolution 1789-1848, Chapters 1, 2 and maps, pp. 7-52 and 363-374.

https://libcom.org/files/Eric%20Hobsbawm%20-%20Age%20Of%20Revolution%201789%20-1848.pdf

George D. H. Cole's, A History of Socialist Thought, Vol. I (The Forerunners 1789-1850) , London: Macmillan & Co. 1953, Chapter IV: "Saint-Simon", pp. 37-50.

https://libcom.org/files/A%20History%20of%20Socialist%20Thought%20Volume%201.pdf

Claude de Saint-Simon, The Organizer [1819]; Industrial System [1821]; and On Social Organization [1825] (excerpts)

https://www.docdroid.net/jLwZfPK/saint-simon.pdf.html

Michel Bourdeau, "Auguste Comte", in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy:

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/comte/

Auguste Comte, System of Positive Polity [1851-4], vol. I, chap. III: "Action of Positivism upon Working Classes", pp. 101-163 (in particular 101-135); vol. II, chap. V: " The Positive theory of the Social Organism", pp. 221-275 (in particular 221-227 and 242-253); and vol. I: "Letter on Social Commemoration, Philosophically Considered, Composed for Madame Clotilde de Vaux on the Occasion of her Birthday", pp. 613-618.

https://www.docdroid.net/d2a58W3/comte-1-vol-1-chap-iii.pdf.html

https://www.docdroid.net/GtKQ1JO/comte-2-vol-2-chap-v.pdf.html

http://solomon.soth.alexanderstreet.com/cgi-bin/asp/philo/soth/getdoc.pl?S10019067-D000012.002

Additional Readings:

Pierre Ansart, Saint-Simon , Paris: Presses Universitaires de France 1969.

Pierre Ansart, Sociologie de Saint-Simon , Paris: Presses Universitaires de France 1970.

George Iggers, "Elements of a Sociology of Ideas in the Saint-Simonian Philosophy of History", in Sociological Quarterly, vol. 1 (1960).

Mary Pickering, Auguste Comte: An Intellectual Biography, 3 voll., Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1993-2009.

Week 2 – 14 January: Utopian Sociology

Required Readings:

Gregory Claeys, “Non-Marxian Socialism 1815-1914", in Gareth Stedman Jones - Gregory Claeys, The Cambridge History of Nineteenth-Century Political History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1979, Chapter 16, sections 1-5, pp. 521-542.

Gregory Claeys, “Socialism and Utopia”, in Roland Schaer, Gregory Claeys, and Lyman Tower Sargent (eds), Utopia : The Search for the Ideal Society in the Western World, New York: The New York Public Library - Oxford University Press 2000, pp. 206–40.

George D. H. Cole's, A History of Socialist Thought, Vol. I (The Forerunners 1789-1850) , Chapter VI: 'Fourier and Fourierism', pp. 62-74.

Charles Fourier, Theory of the Four Movements [1808];The New Industrial Wolrd [1830]; and The Phalanx [posthumous 1841-45]; and other minor writings (excerpts).

Leslie Goldstein, "Early Feminist Themes in French Utopian Socialism: The Saint-Simonian and Fourier", in Journal of the History of Ideas, vol. 35 (1974).

Additional Readings:

Carl Landauer, European Socialism, Chapter I: "The Three Anticapitalistic Movement", (sections 1-5), Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1959, pp. 21-59.

Barbara Goodwin, Social Science and Utopia: Nineteenth-Century Models of Social Harmony , Hassockes: Harvester Press 1978.

Jonathan Beecher, Charles Fourier: the Visionary and His World, Berkeley: University of California Press 1986.

N. V. Riasanovsky, The Teaching of Charles Fourier, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1969.

Pamela Pilbeam, French Socialists before Marx: Workers, Women, and the Social Question in France . Teddington: Acumen 2000.

Week 3 – 21 January: Liberalism

Required Readings:

Selection of texts from the writings of Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, and others (TBA).

Additional Readings:

TBA

Week 4 – 28 January: Anti-capitalism (Politics)

Required Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, How to Change the World: Tales of Marx and Marxism, Chapter 2: "Marx, Engels and Pre-Marxian Socialism", London/New York: Little, Brown 2010.

Karl Marx, Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 [1844], Manifesto of the Commust Party [1848] (section III), "Wage Labour and Capital" [1849], and other minor writings, pp. 83-121, 262-70, 273-96, 362-69.

https://wiki.zirve.edu.tr/sandbox/groups/economicsandadministrativesciences/wiki/ad713/attachments/1a247/Karl_Marx__Selected_Writings.pdf?sessionID=8940d4002f706e131a7b4041f136555e3b9837d4

Karl Marx, Resolutions of the International Working Men's Association (Nr. 2, 7, 12, 34, 44, 46, 65, 68, 71, 72, 74 and 75) [1864-72]; and other writings (excerpts).

https://www.bloomsburycollections.com/book/workers-unite-the-international-150-years-later/

Additional Readings:

Maximilien Rubel – Margaret Manale, Marx Without Myth: A Chronological Study of his Life and Work, New York: Harper & Row, 1975.

Joseph O'Malley and Keith Algozin (eds), Rubel on Karl Marx: Five Essays, Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 1981.

Marcello Musto, “Introduction”, in Id. (Ed.), Workers Unite! The International 150 Years Later (Editor), London–New York: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 1-68.

John Bellamy Foster, Marx's Ecology, New York: Monthly Review Press 2000.

Week 5 – 4 February: Anti-capitalism (Political Economy)

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Grundrisse [1857-58]; Capital, vol. I [1867] (sections 3, 6, 10-13); "Results of the Immediate Process of Production"; "On Bakunin's Sattism and Anarchy", Critique of the Gotha Programme, and other writings (excerpts), pp. 373-430, 452-525 (but only the sections indicated above), 547-561, 606-28.

Additional Readings:

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'Passage to Socialism: The Dialectic of Progress in Marx', Historical Materialism, Vol. 14, n.3 (2006), pp. 45-84.

Roman Rosdolsky, The Making of Marx’s Capital, London: Pluto 1977 (Chapters XXVIII and XXIX).

Michael Lebowitz, Beyond Capital, Basingstoke: Palgrave 2003, pp. 27-50

Kevin Anderson, Marx at the Margins, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 2010.

Bertell Ollman (et al.), Market Socialism: The Debate Among Socialist, London: Routledge 1998.

Week 6 – 11 February: Structural functionalism

Required Readings:

Emile Durkheim, Socialism and Saint-Simon [posthumous 1928], Chapters 1, 2, 7-9, 10 and 12; Lectures on Sociology, and the "Preface" to the second edition of The Division of Labour in Society.

http://14.139.206.50:8080/jspui/bitstream/1/1966/1/Durkheim,%20Emile%20-%20Socialism%20and%20Saint%20Simon.pdf

http://14.139.206.50:8080/jspui/bitstream/1/1970/1/Durkheim,%20Emile%20-%20The%20Division%20of%20Labour%20in%20Society.pdf

Additional Readings:

Steven Lukes, Émile Durkheim: His Life and Works. Middlesex: Penguin Books, 1973.

Marcel Fournier, Emile Durkheim 1858-1917. Paris: Fayard, 2007.

Stephen Turner (ed.), Emile Durkheim: Sociologist and Moralist, New York: Rutledge, 1993.

Susan Stedman-Jones, Durkheim Reconsidered, Cambridge: Polity Press, 2001.

Kenneth Thompson, Emile Durkheim. London: Routledge, 1982.

Anthony Giddens, Durkheim, ‪London: Harvester, 1978.

Warren Schmaus, Rethinking Durkheim and his Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.

Week 7 – 3 March: Anarchism

Required Readings:

Peter Kropotkin, Anarchism [1910]; and The Conquest of Bread [1892].

http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist_Archives/kropotkin/britanniaanarchy.html

http://dwardmac.pitzer.edu/Anarchist_Archives/kropotkin/conquest/toc.html

Additional Readings:

George Woodcock - Ivan Avakumovic, The Anarchist Prince: A Biographical Study of Peter Kropotkin, London/New York: Boardman & Co 1950.

Caroline Cahm, Kropotkin and the Rise of Revolutionary Anarchism 1872–1886, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1989.

https://libcom.org/files/cahm-kropotkin_and_the_rise_of_revolutionary_anarchism_1872-1886.pdf

Brian Morris, Kropotkin: The Politics of Community, Amherst: Humanity Books 2004.

Week 8 – 10 March: On the Other Side of the Atlantic: Critical Sociology in the USA

Required Readings:

Alexis de Tocqueville, Democracy in America [1835 - 1840] (excerpts).

Thorstein Veblen, Theory of the Leisure Class [1899] (excerpts).

Charles Wright Mills, White Collar [1951] (excerpts).

Additional Readings:

Cheryl Welch, De Tocqueville, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Stephen Edgell, Veblen in Perspective: His Life and Thought, New York: M.E. Sharpe, 2001.

John Eldridge, C. Wright Mills, London: Horwood, 1983.

Week 9 – 17 March: Rational Capitalism

Required Readings:

Max Weber, Economy and Society [posthumous 1922] (excerpts) and "Socialism" [1918], in Peter Lassman - Ronald Speirs (eds), Max Weber: Political Writings, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.

Additional Readings:

Joachim Radkau, Max Weber: a Biography, London: Polity, 2009.

Charles Camic, Philip Gorski and David Trubek (eds.), Max Weber’s Economy and Society: A Critical Companion, Stanford University Press 2005.

Collins, Randall, “Weber and the Sociology of Revolution”, Journal of Classical Sociology, vol. 1 (2001), No. 2, pp. 171-194.

Bryan S. Turner, Max Weber: From History to Modernity, London: Routledge 1993.

Reinhard Bendix, Max Weber: An Intellectual Portrait, Berkeley: University of California Press 1978.

Week 10 – 24 March: Heterodox Communisms

Required Readings:

Marcel van der Linden, "On Council Communism", in Historical Materialism, vol. 12 (2004), n. 4.

https://libcom.org/files/Council%20communism.pdf

Rosa Luxemburg, Reform or Revolution [1900] (sections 3-5 and 7-9); The Mass Strike, the Political Party and the Trade Unions [1906] (sections 4 and 6-8); "The Socialisation of Society" [1918].

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1900/reform-revolution/index.htm

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1906/mass-strike/index.htm

https://www.marxists.org/archive/luxemburg/1918/12/20.htm

Karl Korsch, "What is Socialization?" [1919].

https://pages.gseis.ucla.edu/faculty/kellner/Korsch.pdf

Antonio Gramsci, Prison Notebooks [1929-35] and other minor writings (excerpts).

Anton Pannekoek, Workers' Councils [1946], Chapters I and 2.

https://libcom.org/library/workers-councils-1-pannekoek

https://libcom.org/library/workers-councils-2-pannekoek

Additional Readings:

Lelio Basso, Rosa Luxemburg: A Reappraisal, London: Deutsch 1975.

Paul Mattick, Anti-Bolshevik Communism, London: Merlin 1978.

[and also by the same author on Karl Korsch: https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1964/korsch.htm and https://www.marxists.org/archive/mattick-paul/1962/korsch.htm]

Marcel van der Linden, Western Marxism and the Soviet Union, Leiden: Brill 2007.

https://libcom.org/files/van_der_linden_western_marxism_and_soviet_union.pdf

Antonio Santucci, Antonio Gramsci, New York: Monthly Review Press 2010.

Week 11 – 31 March: The Frankfurt School

Required Readings:

Selections from the writings of Walter Benjamin, Max Horkheimer, Theodor W. Adorno and other authors (TBA).

Additional Readings

Jay Bernstein (Ed.), The Frankfurt School: Critical Assessments, 6 voll., London: Routledge, 1994.

Week 12 – 7 April: Feminism

Required Readings:

Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex [1949] (excerpts).

Luce Irigaray, Speculum of the Other Woman [1974] (excerpts); and This Sex Which Is Not One [1977] (Chapter 8 "Women on the Market" and excerpts).

Additional Readings:

Nancy Holmstrom, The Socialist Feminist Project: A Contemporary Reader in Theory and Politics, New York: Monthly Review Press 2002.

Rosemary Hennessy - Chris Ingraham, Materialist Feminism: A Reader in Class, Difference, and Women's Lives, New York: Routledge 1997.

D. Bair, Introduction to Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, Vintage, 1989.

Z. Eisenstein (ed.), Capitalist Patriarchy and the Case for Socialist Feminism, New York: Monthly Review Press 1979.

February 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

GS/POLS 6055 – GS/SPTH 6219 3.0 M (W)

From Hegel to Marx

Winter 2012

 

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Lecture Time: Tue 17:30-20.30

Class Location: Ross Building, S 674

Office Location: Ross Building, N 813 Office Hours: Tue 15:30-16:30 / Thu 19:00-20:00

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 416 – 736 2100, Ext. 20241

Course Syllabus

The course will examine some of the most important writings of the major German authors of the first half of the Nineteenth Century, who transformed irreversibly the philosophical and the political thought. The first part of the seminar will focus on two of Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's main works: the Phenomenology of the Spirit and the Elements of the Philosophy of Right, which will also be considered in relation to the most important Marxist secondary literature on Hegel written in German (Herbert Marcuse, György Lukács and Ernst Bloch) and writings that played a big role in the French controversy on the relation between Hegel and Karl Marx ( Alexandre Kojève and Jean Hyppolite).

The course will then concentrate on some of the key members of the Left Hegelian school, in particular Bruno Bauer, Ludwig Feuerbach, Marx and Max Stirner, through the analysis of their most influential works (among them Feuerbach's The Essence of Christianity and Principles of Philosophy of the Future; Marx's Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 and The German Ideology - written with Engels; and Stirner's The Ego and Its Own). In addition one will take up some of the debates of the time, like those on the critique of Christianity, the critique of the speculative thought, the overturning of Hegelian philosophy, materialism, atheism, and the role of the individual.

The main aim of the seminar will be reconstructing the elaboration of Marx's thought in its early stages. The path "from Hegel to Marx" will be investigated not solely philosophically but through an inter-disciplinary approach, i.e., analyzing the philosophical writings of the time, but vis-à-vis with Marx's discovery of political economy and Socialism. Therefore, besides philosophical and political themes like species-being, human emancipation, and the relation between State and civil society, one will discuss other significant theoretical acquisitions by Marx, like the critique of alienated labour, the understanding of the revolutionary role of the proletariat, the adhesion to Communism, and the development of a materialist conception of history. This will be facilitated by highlighting Marx's decisive encounter with political economy - first through the writings of Friedrich Engels, Moses Hess and Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, and then Adam Smith and David Ricardo -, and by examining the influence that the early Socialists Henri de Saint Simon, Charles Fourier and Robert Owen had on the development of his ideas.

The final class of the course will look critically at the most influential Marxist writings published in the 1960s and 1970s on the "young Marx" versus "mature Marx" debate, revealing some of their textual limitations and interpretative mystifications. This will be pursued by through attention to the latest philological acquisitions related to Marx's works (the Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 and The German Ideology will be reconsidered on the basis of their new editions) and the most recent secondary literature on the Left Hegelians.

 Course Requirements

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars lasting 2 hours and 50 minutes. Attendance is strongly recommended and students are expected to participate actively in class discussion.

Presentation:

Each class will begin with a student presentation (20 - 30 minutes) on the assigned readings. Please avoid just reading a paper aloud, and try to draw the attention of the class to issues on which the presenter would like class discussion and comment.

Final Paper Proposal:

Students are free to propose their own final paper topic, but it must be related to the topics and the readings of the course syllabus. The final paper proposal should be 3-4 pages and include the following information:

- Indication of the title;

- Preliminary outline of the paper and its problematic;

- 6-8 keywords concerning the themes and concepts to be addressed;

- A bibliography of at least 8-10 sources consulted;

Final paper proposals will be due by 13 March, in hard copy and by email.

Final Paper:

The Final Paper, approved through the Final Paper Proposal, will be due in hard copy and by email 27 April and should:

- be approximately 5,000 words;

- be clearly structured (divided in at least 3 or 4 sections);

- have references from hard copy books with the indication of page numbers (no references from the internet other than published works).

Access to Readings:

The reading list has been organized as follows: each topic specifies a number of Required Readings. These are the minimum which you should read every week in order to be able to participate fully in the seminar discussions. You can go deeper into the topic using the Additional Readings, and you should do so with at least a couple of them when you prepare your presentations.

The volumes G. W. F. Hegel, Phenomenology of Spirit, OUP 1980, G. W. F. Hegel, Outlines of the Philosophy of Right, OUP 2008, and K. Marx, Early Writings (Penguin, 1992) have been ordered for the bookstore.

The writings of Marx and Engels published in the Marx-Engels Collected Works (50 volumes, 1975-2005) are available online at http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/cw/index.htm.

Many of the required readings are available on-line (more information could be found at www.marcellomusto.com); while the following books are on reserve at Scott library:

Adam Schaff , Alienation as a Social Phenomenon , Pergamon Press 1980.

Iring Fetscher, Marx and Marxism, Seabury Pr 1971.

Ernest Mandel, The Formation of the Economic Thought of Karl Marx, 1843 to Capital, Monthly Review Press 1971.

David McNally, Against the Market: Political Economy, Market Socialism and the Marxist Critique, Verso 1996.

Henri de Saint Simon, Selected writings on science, industry and social organisation, Croom Helm, 1975.

Eric Hobsbawm, How to Change the World: Tales of Marx and Marxism, Little Brown 1982.

Max Stirner,The Ego and Its Own, CUP 1995.

Terrell Carver, The Postmodern Marx, Pennstate 1998.

Karl Löwith, From Hegel to Nietzsche, Columbia University Press 1964.

Michael Lowy, The Theory of Revolution in the Young Marx, Haymarket 2005.

McLellan, Marx before Marxism, Palgrave Macmillan 1970.

Auguste Cornu, Karl Marx et Friedrich Engels . Leur vie et leur oeuvre, PUF 1955-1970 (4 voll.)

Norman Levine, Divergent Paths, Lexington 2006.

L.S. Stepelevich (ed.), The Young Hegelians. An Anthology, CUP 1983.

David Leopold, The Young Karl Marx, Cambridge University Press 2007.

Jean Hyppolite , Studies on Marx and Hegel, Harper & Row 1969.

Alexandre Kojève, Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit, Cornell University Press, 1980.

György Lukács , The Young Hegel , Merlin Press 1975.

Herbert Marcuse, Reason and Revolution: Hegel and the Rise of Social Theory, Humanity Books, 1999.

Herbert Marcuse, Hegel's Ontology and Theory of Historicity, The MIT Press, 1989.

 Darren Webb, Marx, Marxism and Utopia, Ashgate 2000.

Vincent Geoghegan, Utopianism and Marxism, Peter Lang 2008 [1987].

Ernst Bloch's Subjekt-Objekt. Erläuterungen zu Hegel has yet to be translated. Two chapters of the book have been published in academic journals (“Dialectics and Hope,” translated by Mark Ritter in New German Critique in 1976 and “The Dialectical Method,” translated by John Lamb in Man and World in 1983), but, unfortunately, the work as a whole remains unknown to the English-speaking world.

Bruno Bauer's Die Judenfrage has never been published in English. Nevertheless, a translation of this work was made by Helen Lederer( The Jewish Question, typescript dated 1958). A copy of this manuscript, held by the Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati - Ohio, has been photocopied for this class and it is now on reserve at Scott Library.

Course Evaluation

Class Participation

20%

2 Presentations 15% each

30%

Final paper proposal

10%

Final paper

40%

Schedule of Classes and Readings

Jan 3 Introduction and overview

Jan 10 In the beginning there was Hegel

Required Readings:

Karl Löwith, From Hegel to Nietzsche, Columbia University Press, 1964 [1941] (Chapter 1).

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Phenomenology of the Spirit [1807] (the following parts: Preface, Introduction, Chapter IV on 'Self-consciousness', and Chapter VIII on 'Absolute Knowing').

Karl Marx, Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 [1844](section: 'Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy in General').

Additional Readings: 

Karl Rosenkranz, Hegels Leben, WBG 1998 [1844].

Herbert Marcuse, Hegel's Ontology and Theory of Historicity, The MIT Press 1989 [1932].

Herbert Marcuse, Reason and Revolution: Hegel and the Rise of Social Theory, Humanity Books 1999 [1941].

György Lukács , The Young Hegel , Merlin Press 1975 [1938] (Part IV, Chapter 4: ‘Entäusserung’ as the central philosophical concept of The Phenomenology of Mind).

Alexandre Kojève, Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit, Cornell University Press 1980 [1947] (especially 169-289).

Ernst Bloch, Subjekt-Objekt. Erläuterungen zu Hegel, Suhrkamp, 1962 [1949].

Jean Hyppolite , Studies on Marx and Hegel, Harper & Row, 1969 [1955].

http://www.scribd.com/doc/24765650/Studies-on-Marx-and-Hegel-Jean-Hyppolite

Theodor W. Adorno, Hegel: Three Studies, The MIT Press, 1993 [1963].

http://www.scribd.com/doc/28370870/Adorno-Hegel-Three-Studies

Norman Levine, Divergent Paths, Lexington 2006.

Jan 17 Hegel and Marx on State and civil society

Required Readings:

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Elements of the Philosophy of Right (§ 261-313) [1820].

Karl Marx, Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right [1843].

Additional Readings:

Karl Marx, “Letter to his father (November 10, 1837)”

Gordon Hull, "Marx's anomalous reading of Spinoza", Interpretation, Vol. 28, n. 1(1999), pp. 17-31.

Maximilien Rubel – Margaret Manale, Marx Without Myth: AChronological Study of His Life and Work, Blackwell 1975.

David McLellan, Karl Marx: his life and thought, Palgrave 2006.

Hal Draper, The Marx-Engels Chronicle, Schoken Books 1985.

 Marcello Musto, "The Rediscovery of Karl Marx", International Review of Social History, Vol. 52 part 3, (2007), pp. 477-498.

Jan 24 Bauer and Marx on the Jewish question

Required Readings:

David Leopold, The Young Karl Marx, Cambridge University Press, 2007 (Chapter 3, pp. 100-182).

Bruno Bauer, The Jewish Problem [1842].

Karl Marx, On the Jewish Question [1844].

Friedrich Engels - Karl Marx, The Holy family [1845] (Chapter 6: Absolute Critical Criticism, Or Critical Criticism As Herr Bruno).

Additional Readings:

L.S. Stepelevich (ed.), The Young Hegelians. An Anthology, CUP 1983.

http://books.google.ie/books/about/The_Young_Hegelians_an_anthology.html?id=0X86AAAAIAAJ

Auguste Cornu, Karl Marx et Friedrich Engels . Leur vie et leur oeuvre, Puf 1955-1970.

David McLellan, Marx before Marxism, Palgrave Macmillan 1970 (Chapters 1-3).

Jan 31 Marx's encounter with political economy

Required Readings:

Karl Marx,"Proceedings of the Sixth Rhine Province Assembly, third article, ' Debates on the Law on Thefts of Wood'" [1842].

Karl Marx,“Contribution to a Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right. Introduction” [1844].

Friedrich Engels, "Outlines of a Critique of Political Economy" [1844].

Moses Hess, "The Essence of Money" [1845]

Required Readings:

http://www.marxists.org/archive/hess/1845/essence-money.htm

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, What is property? (Chapter 2) [1840].

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/360

Karl Marx,"Critical Notes on the Article 'The King of Prussia and Social Reform. By a Prussian'" [1844].

Additional Readings:

Karl Marx,Letters from the Deutsch-Französische Jahrbücher [1844].

Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations [1776] (Book I, Chapters: I 'Of the Division of Labor'; VIII 'Of the Wages of Labour'; and IX 'Of the Profits of Stock').

David Ricardo, On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation [1817] (Chapters: 1 'On value'; 2 'On rent'; 5 'Of wages'; 6 'On profit').

Friedrich Engels, The Condition of the Working Class in England [1845].

Daniel Bensaid, Les dépossédés. Karl Marx, les voleurs de bois e le droit des pauvres, La fabrique éditions, 2007.

Michael Lowy, The Theory of Revolution in the Young Marx, Haymarket, 2005.

Feb 7 Feuerbach and the passage from speculative philosophy to materialism

Required Readings:

Karl Löwith, From Hegel to Nietzsche, (Chapter 2: pp. 65-110).

Ludwig Feuerbach, "Towards a Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy" [1839].

http://marxists.org/reference/archive/feuerbach/works/critique/index.htm

Ludwig Feuerbach, "Preliminary Theses on the Reform of Philosophy" [1843].

http://books.google.ca/books?id=b2js6q67YEUC&pg=PA42&lpg=PA42&dq=feuerbach+Preliminary+Theses+on+the+Reform+of+Philosophy&source=bl&ots=I8V9AkxdPR&sig=Xs89TF2WVIJY7sPXNQYquMb8Vc4&hl=en&ei=L8JZTo3NAtPegQepyKSVDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=3&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=feuerbach%20Preliminary%20Theses%20on%20the%20Reform%20of%20Philosophy&f=false

Ludwig Feuerbach, Principles of Philosophy of the Future [1844].

 http://marxists.org/reference/archive/feuerbach/works/future/index.htm

Karl Marx,Theses on Feuerbach [1845].

Additional Readings:

Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity [1841].

http://marxists.org/reference/archive/feuerbach/works/essence/index.htm

Friedrich Engels, Ludwig Feuerbach and the End of Classical German Philosophy [1886].

Feb 14 Marx I. Alienated labour

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'Marx in Paris. Manuscripts and notebooks of 1844', Science & Society, Vol. 73, n. 3 (July 2009): 386-402.

Jürgen Rojahn, 'The emergence of a theory: the importance of Marx’s notebooks exemplified by those from 1844', Rethinking Marxism, Vol. 14, n. 4 (2002): 29-46.

Karl Marx, Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 [1844](especially the sections: 'Estranged Labour', 'The Relationship of Private Property', 'Private Property and Labour', and 'Private Property and Communism').

Karl Marx, "Comments on James Mill, Éléments d’économie Politique" [1844].

Additional Readings:

Marcello Musto, “Revisiting Marx’s Concept of Alienation”, Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (November 2010): 79-101.

Terrell Carver, Marx's conception of alienation in the 'Grundrisse', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the critique of political economy 150 years later, Routledge, 2008 (pp. 48-66).

Michael Maidan, "The Rezeptionsgeschichte of the Paris Manuscripts ", History of European Ideas, Vol. 12 (1990), pp. 767–781.

Feb 28 Marx II. The birth of the materialist conception of history

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, 'Preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy' [1859].

Terrell Carver “The German Ideology Never Took Place”, History of Political Thought, Vol. 31 (1), pp. 107-127.

Friedrich Engels - Karl Marx, The German Ideology (Chapters I: “Feuerbach: Opposition of the Materialist and Idealist Outlooks”, and II: 'Saint Bruno') [1845-46].

Additional Readings:

Terrell Carver, The Postmodern Marx, Pennstate 1998 (pp. 87-118).

Tadashi Shibuya, Editorial problems in establishing a new edition of 'The German Ideology', in Hiroshi Uchida (ed.), Marx for the 21st century, Routledge 2006 (pp. 193-200).

Takahisa Oishi, The unknown Marx, Pluto 2001 (pp. 179-188).

Mar 6 Stirner, or the nihilism of the critique

Required Readings:

Max Stirner,The Ego and Its Own [1844], CUP 1995 (pp. 89-324).

http://www.lsr-projekt.de/poly/enee.html

Friedrich Engels - Karl Marx, The German Ideology [1845-46] (Chapter III: 'Saint Max').

Additional Readings:

Ludwig Feuerbach and Max Stirner on Atheism

http://www.lsr-projekt.de/poly/enfeuerbach.html

David Leopold, 'Introduction" in Max Stirner,The Ego and Its Own, CUP 1995, pp. xi-xxxii.

Mar 13 The early Socialists and their influence on Marx

Required Readings:

Eric Hobsbawm, How to Change the World: Tales of Marx and Marxism (chapter 2: 'Marx, Engels and Pre-Marxian socialism').

Karl Marx, Plan of the “Library of the Best Foreign Socialist Writers” [1845].

http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1845/03/writers.htm

Friedrich Engels - Karl Marx, The German Ideology (Volume II: Critique of German Socialism According to Its Various Prophets).

Henri de Saint Simon, Selected writings on science, industry and social organisation, Croom Helm, 1975 (Part III: "From the government of men to the administration of things (1817-1820)", pp. 157-222).

Charles Fourier, 'The Phalanstery' (Fragment I).

http://marxists.org/reference/archive/fourier/works/ch20.htm

Charles Fourier, 'The Phalanstery' (Fragment II).

http://marxists.org/reference/archive/fourier/works/ch27.htm

Charles Fourier, 'Attractive Labour'.

http://marxists.org/reference/archive/fourier/works/ch26.htm

Robert Owen, A New View of Society (Essay Two: 'The Principles of the Former Essay continued, and applied in part to Practice', and Essay Four: 'The end of government is to make the governed and the governors happy').

http://marxists.org/reference/subject/economics/owen/index.htm#new-view

Friedrich Engels – Karl Marx, Manifesto of the Communist Party (Chap. III: 'Socialist and Communist Literature').

http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1848/communist-manifesto/index.htm

Additional Readings:

Carl Landauer, European Socialism, (Chapter I: 'The Three Anticapitalistic Movement', sections 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5) pp. 21-59.

George D.H. Cole, Socialist Thought, Volume I: The Forerunners 1789-1850, (Chapters IV: 'Saint-Simon', VI: 'Fourier and Fourierism', IX: 'Owen and Owenism - Earlier Phases'), pp. 37-50, 62-74 and 86-101.

Darren Webb, Marx, Marxism and Utopia, Ashgate 2000.

Vincent Geoghegan, Utopianism and Marxism, Peter Lang 2008 [1987].

Friedrich Engels, "Description of Recently Founded Communist Colonies Still in Existence", and "Rapid Progress of Communism in Germany" (from MECW, vol. 4).

Description of Recently Founded Communist Colonies Still in Existence

Rapid Progress of Communism in Germany

Mar 20 Which kind of Socialism? Marx versus Proudhon

Required Readings:

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, System of Economical Contradictions; or, the Philosophy of Misery [1846] (From the English translation the chapters: "Introduction", I. "Of the economic science", and from the original French edition the chapters IX. "La Communauté", and X. "Conclusion").

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/444

http://classiques.uqac.ca/classiques/Proudhon/systeme_contr_eco/systeme_contr_eco.html (pp. 129-155 of the PDF file)

Friedrich Engels - Karl Marx, The Holy Family [1845] (Chapter IV, § 4 "Proudhon").

Karl Marx, The Poverty of Philosophy [1847](Chapter II: 'The Metaphysics of Political Economy').

Karl Marx,"Letter to Pavel Vasilyevich Annenkov (December 28, 1846)".

Additional Readings:

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century (Chap. III: 'The Principle of Association', and Chap. VI: section 3: 'Division of Labour, Collective Forces, Machines, Workingmen’s Associations')

http://fair-use.org/p-j-proudhon/general-idea-of-the-revolution/

Karl Marx, On Proudhon

http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1865/letters/65_01_24.htm

David McNally, Against the Market: Political Economy, Market Socialism and the Marxist Critique, Verso 1996 (Chapter 5: 'Proudhon Did Enormous Mischief': Marx's Critique of the First Market Socialists'), pp. 139-169.

Mar 27 The myth of the "young Marx"

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, "The myth of the 'young Marx' in the interpretations of the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844" [forthcoming 2012].

Ernest Mandel, The Formation of the Economic Thought of Karl Marx, 1843 to Capital, Monthly Review Press 1971 [1967] (Chapter X).

Louis Althusser, For Marx, Verso 2005 [1965] (Chapter 2: 'On the Young Marx').

http://www.marx2mao.com/Other/FM65i.html

Louis Althusser, Essays in Self-Criticism, New Left Books 1976 ('Reply to John Lewis' - 1973; and 'Elements of Self-Criticism' - 1974).

http://www.marx2mao.com/Other/ESC76NB.html

István Mészáros, Marx's Theory of Alienation [1970].

http://www.marxists.org/archive/meszaros/works/alien/index.htm

Adam Schaff , Alienation as a Social Phenomenon , Pergamon Press 1980 [1977] (Part I: 'Marxism and the theory of alienation').

Bertell Ollman, Alienation: Marx's conception of man in capitalist society, CUP 1971 (Chapters 1-4, 18-22).

http://www.nyu.edu/projects/ollman/books/a.php

Iring Fetscher, Marx and Marxism, Seabury Pr 1971 [1967] (Chapter 1 and the Appendix I).

Additional Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'The Formation of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: From the Studies of 1843 to the Grundrisse', Socialism & Democracy, Vol. 24 n. 3 (July 2010): 66-100.

February 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

GS/POLS 6060 3.0 M (W) – GS/SPTH 6200 3.0

Appropriating Marx’s Capital I

Winter 2011

Course Director: Dr. Marcello Musto

Lecture Time: Tue, 17:30 – 20.30

Class Location: Ross Building, S674

Office Location: 620 Atkinson College Office Hours: Tue. 15:30-16:30

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 416 – 736 2100 - Ext. 20241

Course Syllabus

Two decades after 1989, when he was too hastily consigned to oblivion, Karl Marx has returned to the limelight. In the last few years Capital has not only received the attention of university professors, but has also been the focus of widespread interest prompted by the international financial crisis, as leading daily and weekly papers throughout the world have been discussing the contemporary relevance of its pages. Furthermore, the literature dealing with Marx, which all but dried up 20 years ago, is showing signs of revival in many countries; and there are now, once again, many international conferences and university courses dedicated to his analysis of capitalism. Though among the most important books of the last 150 years, Marx’s Capital nevertheless represents an incomplete project. Marx himself was only able to publish the first volume (1867) in his lifetime; volumes two (1885) and three (1894) were prepared for publication by Friedrich Engels. Moreover, after Engels’ death, many of Capital’s preparatory manuscripts were published by others still, some of which provided valuable further elucidations of Marx’s theoretical project, sometimes significantly changing previous interpretations (e.g., the Grundrisse, published by the Marx-Engels-Lenin Institute of Moscow in 1939, and translated into English only in 1973).

The first part of this course aims to reconstruct all the stages of Marx’s critique of political economy (starting from Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844), and, particularly, the making of Capital, Volume I through its various preparatory drafts, like the Grundrisse (the interpretation of which will be emphasized), the Theories of Surplus Value and the 'Results of the Immediate Process of Production', better known as the 'Unpublished Chapter VI'.

The second part of the seminar will be dedicated to a close reading of Capital, Volume I, with particular attention to the following topics: a) the transformation of money into capital; b) the analysis of absolute and relative surplus-value; c) the primitive accumulation of capital; and d) Marx's conception of post-capitalistic society as it appears in the most political sections of his opus magnum.

The final class of the course will look critically at the readings of Capital elaborated by some of the main schools of Marxism of the Twentieth Century, and consider the most important works published in recent years on the continuing relevance of Marx’s Capital for an understanding of the contemporary world and its problems.

Course Requirements and evaluation

Class Participation

30%

Presentation (30 min.)

10%

Presentation Essay (1500 – 2000 words)

15%

Final paper (5000 words)

45%

Starting January 18, each class will begin with a 30 minute student presentation. The presentation essay is due (in hard copy and electronic copy) one week after the presentation, so that they can be eventually revised according to the class discussion.

The final paper will be an essay addressing one of the problematic of the course and will be due 18 April, in hard copy and also by email.

Access to Readings:

The reading list has been organized as follows: each topic specifies a number of Required Readings. These are the minimum which you should read every week in order to be able to participate fully in the seminar discussions. You can go deeper into the topic using the Additional Readings, and you should certainly do so when you come to prepare your presentation.

The volumes of Marx-Engels Collected Works are available online at http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/cw/index.htm; while the other books and articles indicated in the readings are on reserve at Scott library.

Finally, Karl Marx, Grundrisse (Penguin, 1993), Karl Marx, Capital (Penguin, 1990), and Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy (Routledge, 2008) have been ordered for the bookstore.

A list of additional texts by choice for the last class will be distributed during the course.

 Schedule of Classes and Readings

Jan 4 Introduction and Overview

Jan 11 Different Marxes, Different Marxisms

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'The Rediscovery of Karl Marx', International Review of Social History, vol. 52 part 3, 2007: 477-498.

Eric Hobsbawm, 'The Fortunes of Marx's and Engels' Writings'', in idem, ed., The History of Marxism, Volume 1: Marxism in Marx's day, Harvester 1982.

Additional Readings:

Maximilien Rubel – Margaret Manale, Marx Without Myth: AChronological Study of His Life and Work, Oxford: Blackwell 1975.

David McLellan, Karl Marx: his life and thought, London: Palgrave 2006.

Ernest Mandel, 'Marx, Karl Heinrich', in John Eatwell - Murray Milgate - Peter Newman (eds), The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics, Volume 3 , pp. 367-383.

Hal Draper, The Marx-Engels Chronicle, New York: Schoken Books 1985.

Jan 18 The Formation of the Critique of Political Economy: 1843- 1857

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'The Formation of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: From the Studies of 1843 to the Grundrisse', Socialism & Democracy, Vol. 24 n. 3 (July 2010): 66-100.

Karl Marx, 'Preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy' [1859].

Karl Marx, Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 (Sections: 'Estranged Labour', 'The Relationship of Private Property', 'Private Property and Labour', 'Private Property and Communism') [1844].

Karl Marx, The Poverty of Philosophy (Chap. II: 'The Metaphysics of Political Economy') [1847].

Karl Marx, “Wage-Labour and Capital” [1849].

Michael Kräetke, 'The First World Economic Crisis: Marx as an Economic Journalist', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later Routledge: 2008, pp. 162-168.

Karl Marx, articles for the New-York Tribune:

'The Economic Crisis in Europe', 'The Trade Crisis in England', 'The Financial Crisis in Europe' from MECW 15; and 'British Commerce and Finance' from MECW 16.

Additional Readings:

Jürgen Rojahn, 'The emergence of a theory: the importance of Marx’s notebooks exemplified by those from 1844', Rethinking Marxism, vol. 14, n. 4 (2002): 29-46.

Marcello Musto, 'Marx in Paris. Manuscripts and notebooks of 1844', Science & Society, Vol. 73, n. 3 (July 2009): 386-402.

Ernest Mandel, The Formation of the Economic Thought of Karl Marx, 1843 to Capital, New York: Monthly Review Press 1971.

Louis Althusser, For Marx, London: Verso 2005 (Chap. 2: 'On the Young Marx')

Allen Oakley, Marx’s Critique of Political Economy. Intellectual Sources and Evolution. Volume I: 1844 to 1860, London: Routledge 1984.

Karl Marx, articles for the New-York Tribune:

'Pauperism and Free Trade – The Approaching Commercial Crisis' from MECW 11; 'Revolution in China and Europe' and 'Political Movements – Scarcity of Bread in Europe' from MECW 12; 'The Commercial Crisis in Britain' from MECW 13; 'The Crisis in England' from MECW 14; 'The French Crédit Mobilier' (I, II and III), 'The Monetary Crisis in Europe', 'The Causes of the Monetary Crisis in Europe', 'The European Crisis', 'The New French Bank Act', 'The Bank Act of 1844 and the Monetary Crisis in England', 'The Crisis in Europe', 'The French Crisis', 'The Economic Crisis in France' and 'The Financial State of France' from MECW 15; 'The English Bank Act of 1844' and 'Commercial Crises and Currency in Britain' from MECW 16.

Jan 25 The '1857 Introduction'

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Grundrisse ('Introduction'), New York: Penguin 1973, pp. 83-111.

Stuart Hall, 'Marx’s notes on method: A "reading" of the "1857 Introduction"', Cultural Studies, Vol. 17, n. 2 (2003): 113-49.

Marcello Musto, 'History, Production and Method in the 1857 Introduction', in idem, ed., Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 3-32.

Additional Readings:

Terrell Carver, 'Commentary', in idem, ed., Karl Marx: Texts on Method, Oxford: Blackwell 1975, pp. 88-158.

Louis Althusser - Étienne Balibar, Reading Capital, London: Verso 1979.

Feb 1 Capitalism and Earlier Economic Formations

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Grundrisse ('Forms Which Precede Capitalist Production'), pp. 471-513.

Eric Hobsbawm, Introduction to Karl Marx, Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations, International Publishers: 1965, pp. 9-65.

Ellen Meiksins Wood, Historical Materialism in 'Forms Which Precede Capitalist Production' , in Marcello Musto, ed., Karl Marx's Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later , pp. 79-92.

Vv. Aa., 'Dissemination and Reception of the Grundrisse in the World',Marcello Musto, ed., Karl Marx's Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy (Chap. 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24 and 25).

Additional Readings:

Ellen Meiksins Wood, Democracy Against Capitalism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1995 ('Introduction' and Chap. 1: 'The Separation of the 'Economic' and the 'Political' in Capitalism), pp. 1-48.

G. A. Cohen, Karl Marx's Theory of History, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Feb 8 From the Grundrisse to Capital

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy (Chap. I: 'The Commodity').

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I ('Preface to the First Edition'; and 'Postface to the French Edition'), pp. 89-93, 105.

Roman Rosdolsky, The Making of Marx’s Capital, London: Pluto 1977 (Chap. 1 and 2).

Joseph O'Malley - Keith Algozin, ed., Rubel on Karl Marx: Five Essays, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1981.

Moishe Postone, Time, Labor, and Social Domination, Cambridge: Canbridge University Press 1993 (Chap. 1: 'Rethinking Marx's Critique of Capitalism', and Chap. 10: 'Concluding Considerations'), pp. 3-42 and 385-399.

Michael Lebowitz, Beyond Capital, Basingstoke: Palgrave 2003 (Chap. 3: 'The Missing Book on Wage-Labour'), pp. 27-50.

Kevin Anderson, Marx at the Margins, Chicago: University of Chicago Press 2010 (Chap 5: From the Grundrisse to Capital: Multilinear Themes), pp. 151-195.

Additional Readings:

Allen Oakley, Marx’s Critique of Political Economy. Intellectual Sources and Evolution. Volume II: 1861 to 1863, Routledge: 1985.

Allen Oakley, The Making of Marx’s Critical Theory, London: Routledge 1983.

Vytalij Vygoskij, The Story of a Great Discovery: How Karl Marx Wrote 'Capital', Berlin: Verlag der Wirthschaft 1973.

Feb 15 Labour and Capital in the Unpublished 'Chapter VI' of 1863- 1864

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I ('Appendix: Results of the Immediate Process of Production'), pp. 948-1084.

Additional Readings:

Ernest Mandel, 'Appendix: Results of the Immediate Process of Production: Introduction', in Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I, pp. 943-947.

Mar 1 The Transformation of Money into Capital

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (Chap. 3: 'Money, or the Circulation of Commodities', sections 1 'The Measure of Values' and 2(a) 'The Means of Circulation: The Mertamorphosis of Commodities'; Part Two: 'The Transformation of Money into Capital' Chap. 7: 'The Labour Process and the Valorization Process'; and Chap. 10: 'The Working Day', section 7 'The Struggle for a Normal Working Day. Impact of the English Factory Legislation on Other Countries'), pp. 188-209, 247-280, 283-308, 411-416.

Additional Readings:

David Harvey, The Limits to Capital, London: Verso 2006 (Chap. 1: 'Commodities, Values and Class Relation'), pp. 1-38.

Ben Fine - Alfredo Saad-Filho, Marx's Capital, London: Pluto Press 2010.

Ernest Mandel, 'Introduction', in Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I, pp. 11-86.

Kevin Anderson, “The Unknown Marx’s Capital, volume I: The French Edition of 1872-75, 100 Years later”, in Review of Radical Political Economy, vol. 15, n.4 (1983), pp. 71-80.

Mar 8 Exploitation and Surplus-Value

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (Chap. 12: 'The Concept of Relative Surplus-Value'; Chap. 14: 'The Division of Labour and Manufacture'; Chap. 15: 'Machinery and Large-Scale Industry', sections 3 'The Most Immediate Effects of Machine Production on the Worker', 4 'The Factory', 5 'The Struggle between Worker and Machine', and 10 'Large-Scale Industry and Agriculture'; and Chap. 16: 'Absolute and Relative Surplus-Value'), pp. 429-438, 455-491, 517-564, 636-639, 643-654.

Additional Readings:

Enrique Dussel, 'The Discovery of the Category of Surplus Value', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later Routledge: 2008, pp. 66-78.

Enrique Dussel, Towards an unknown Marx: A Commentary on the Manuscritps of 1861-1863, New York: Routledge 2001.

Mar 15 Expropriation and Primitive Accumulation of Capital

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (Chap. 25, section 3: 'Progressive Production of a Relative Surplus Population or Industrial Reserve Army'; Part Eight: 'The So-called Primitive Accumulation'), pp. 781-794, 873-940.

Additional Readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (Part Seven: 'The Process of Accumulation of Capital'), pp. 711-870.

David Harvey, The New Imperialism, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2005 (Chap. 4: 'Accumulation by Disposition').

Mar 22 Marx's Conception of Socialism in Capital and its Preparatory Manuscripts

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Grundrisse ('The Fragments on Machines'), New York: Penguin 1973, pp. 690-712.

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (Chap. I, section 4: 'The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secret Thereof'; Chap. 10: 'The Working Day', section 5 'The Struggle for a Normal Working Day. Laws for the Compulsory Extension of the Working Day, from the Middle of the Fourteenth to the End of the Seventeenth Century'; and Chap. 13: 'Co-operation'), pp. 163-177, 375-389, 439-454.

Iring Fetscher, 'Emancipated Individuals in an Emancipated Society: Marx's Sketch of Post-Capitalist Society in the Grundrisse', in Marcello Musto(ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later Routledge: 2008, pp. 107-119.

Roman Rosdolsky, The Making of Marx’s Capital, London: Pluto 1977 (Chap. XXVIII and XXIX).

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'Passage to Socialism: The Dialectic of Progress in Marx', Historical Materialism, Vol. 14, n.3 (2006), pp. 45-84.

Michael Lebowitz, Beyond Capital, Basingstoke: Palgrave 2003 (Chap. 11: 'From Capital to the Collective Worker'), pp. 197-210.

Additional Readings:

Karl Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme.

Karl Marx, 'Letter to Vera Zasulich' (including the drafts) [1881], in MECW 24.

Daniel Bensaid, Marx for Our Times, London: Verso 2002.

Isaak Illich Rubin, Essays on Marx’s Theory of Value, Detroit: Black & Red 1972.

Mar 29 The Current Importance of Marx

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, ed., Marx for Today (Special Issue of the Journal Socialism and Democracy [vol. 24.3], November 2010), Part II: 'Marx’s Global Reception Today', pp. 147-211.

February 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: York University

York University

GS/POLS 6060 3.0 M (F) – GS/SPTH 6200 3.0

Appropriating Marx’s Capital II

Fall 2011

Course Director: Marcello Musto

Lecture Time: Tue, 17:30 – 20.30

Class Location: Ross Building, S 674

Office Location: Ross Building, S 816 Office Hours: Tue. 15:30-16:30

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Phone: 416 – 736 2100, Ext. 20241

Course Syllabus

Two decades after 1989, when he was too hastily consigned to oblivion, Karl Marx has returned to the limelight. In the last few years Capital has not merely received the attention of university professors, but has also been the focus of widespread interest prompted by the international financial crisis, as leading daily and weekly papers throughout the world have been discussing the contemporary relevance of its pages. Furthermore, the literature dealing with Marx, which all but dried up 20 years ago, is showing signs of revival in many countries; and there are now, once again, many international conferences and university courses dedicated to his analysis of capitalism.

Though among the most important books of the last 150 years, Karl Marx’s Capital nevertheless represents an incomplete project. Marx himself was only able to publish the first volume (1867) in his lifetime; volumes two (1885) and three (1894) were prepared for publication by Friedrich Engels. Moreover, after Engels’ death, many of Capital’s preparatory manuscripts were published by others, still some of which provided valuable further elucidations of Marx’s theoretical project, sometimes significantly changing previous interpretations (e.g., Theories of Surplus Value, edited by Karl Kautsky, in three volumes between 1905 and 1910, and the Grundrisse, published by the Marx-Engels-Lenin Institute of Moscow between 1939-41).

Marx’s notebooks of excerpts and preparatory manuscripts for the second and third volumes of Capital are now being published in German under the auspices of the Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA²) project. The former include not only material from the books he read but also the reflections they stimulated in him; they reveal the trajectory of his thought and the sources on which he drew in developing his own ideas. The publication of all the Capital manuscripts, and all the editorial revisions made by Engels (to be completed in German in 2012), enable a reliable critical evaluation of the extent of Engels’s input into the published editions of Volumes Two and Three.

In the light of the philological acquisitions of MEGA², this course aims to reconstruct all the stages of Marx’s critique of political economy (starting from Parisian studies of 1843-44), and, particularly, the making of Capital through the various drafts, like the Grundrisse (the interpretation of which will be emphasized), the Theories of Surplus Value and the 'Results of the Immediate Process of Production', better known as the 'Unpublished Chapter VI'. Similar attention will be devoted to Marx’s 1850s journalism for the New-York Tribune, in which he dealt with topics beyond those explored in Capital and his scholarly manuscripts, which are important sources for every serious scholar of Marx.

Course Requirements

Class Participation:

This course is taught in weekly seminars lasting 2 hours and 50 minutes. Attendance is strongly recommended and students are expected to participate actively in seminar discussion.

Presentation:

Each class will begin with a student presentation (20 - 30 minutes) on the assigned readings. Please avoid just reading a paper aloud, and try to draw the attention of the class to issues on which the presenter would like class discussion and comment.

Final Paper Proposal:

Students are free to propose their own final paper topic, but it has to be related to the topics and the writings of the course syllabus. Final paper proposal should be 3-4 pages and should include the following information:

- Indication of the title;

- Preliminary outline of the paper and its problematic;

- 6-8 keywords concerning the themes and concepts to be addressed;

- A bibliography of at least 8-10 sources consulted;

Final papers proposal will be due by 22 November, in hard copy and by email.

Final Paper:

The Final Paper, approved through the Final Paper Proposal, will be due in hard copy and by email 15 December and should:

- be approximately 5000 words;

- be clearly structured (divided in at least 3/4 sections);

- have references from hard copy books with the indication of page numbers (no references from internet).

Access to Readings:

The volumes of Marx-Engels Collected Works are available online at http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/cw/index.htm; while the other books and articles indicated in the readings are on reserve at Scott library. Many of the readings are available on-line (more information on the course could be also found at www.marcellomusto.com)

Finally, Karl Marx, Grundrisse (Penguin, 1993), Karl Marx, Capital (Penguin, 1990), and Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy (Routledge, 2008) have been ordered for the bookstore.

Course Evaluation

Class Participation

20%

2 Presentations 15% each

30%

Final paper proposal

10%

Final paper

40%

Schedule of Classes and Readings

Sep 13 Introduction and Overview

Sep 20 Different Marxes, Different Marxisms

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'The Rediscovery of Karl Marx', International Review of Social History, vol. 52 part 3, 2007: 477-498.

Eric Hobsbawm, 'The Fortunes of Marx's and Engels' Writings'', in idem, ed., The History of Marxism, Volume 1: Marxism in Marx's day, Harvester 1982.

Additional Readings:

Maximilien Rubel – Margaret Manale, Marx Without Myth: AChronological Study of His Life and Work, Blackwell 1975.

David McLellan, Karl Marx: his life and thought, Palgrave 2006.

Ernest Mandel, 'Marx, Karl Heinrich', in John Eatwell - Murray Milgate - Peter Newman (eds), The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics, Volume 3 , pp. 367-383.

Hal Draper, The Marx-Engels Chronicle, Schoken Books 1985.

Sep 27 The Formation of the Critique of Political Economy

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, 'Preface to A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy' [1859].

Marcello Musto, 'Marx in Paris. Manuscripts and notebooks of 1844', Science & Society, Vol. 73, n. 3 (July 2009): 386-402.

Karl Marx, Economic-Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844 (Sections: 'Estranged Labour', 'The Relationship of Private Property', 'Private Property and Labour', 'Private Property and Communism') [1844].

Karl Marx, The Poverty of Philosophy (Chapter II: 'The Metaphysics of Political Economy') [1847].

Karl Marx, “Wage-Labour and Capital” [1849] (especially the sections: I, III and V).

Additional Readings:

Jürgen Rojahn, 'The emergence of a theory: the importance of Marx’s notebooks exemplified by those from 1844', Rethinking Marxism, Vol. 14, n. 4 (2002): 29-46.

Ernest Mandel, The Formation of the Economic Thought of Karl Marx, 1843 to Capital, New York: Monthly Review Press 1971.

Louis Althusser, For Marx, Verso 2005 (Chapter 2: 'On the Young Marx').

Allen Oakley, Marx’s Critique of Political Economy. Intellectual Sources and Evolution. Volume I: 1844 to 1860, Routledge 1984.

Oct 4 Marx at the time of the First World Economic Crisis

Marcello Musto, 'The Formation of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: From the Studies of 1843 to the Grundrisse', Socialism & Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (July 2010), pp. 66-100.

Michael Krätke, 'The First World Economic Crisis: Marx as an Economic Journalist', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 162-168.

Karl Marx, articles for the New-York Tribune:

'The Economic Crisis in Europe', 'The Trade Crisis in England', 'The Financial Crisis in Europe' from MECW 15; and 'British Commerce and Finance' from MECW 16.

Plus five other articles, by choice, among those listed below:

'Pauperism and Free Trade – The Approaching Commercial Crisis' from MECW 11; 'Revolution in China and Europe' and 'Political Movements – Scarcity of Bread in Europe' from MECW 12; 'The Commercial Crisis in Britain' from MECW 13; 'The Crisis in England' from MECW 14; 'The French Crédit Mobilier' (I, II and III), 'The Monetary Crisis in Europe', 'The Causes of the Monetary Crisis in Europe', 'The European Crisis', 'The New French Bank Act', 'The Bank Act of 1844 and the Monetary Crisis in England', 'The Crisis in Europe', 'The French Crisis', 'The Economic Crisis in France' and 'The Financial State of France' from MECW 15; 'The English Bank Act of 1844' and 'Commercial Crises and Currency in Britain' from MECW 16.

Additional Readings:

Michael Perelman, Marx's Crises Theory, Praeger 1987.

Makoto Itoh, Value and Crisis, Monthly Review Press 1980.

Michael Krätke, 'Marx's 'books of crisis' of 1857-8', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, Routledge 2008, pp. 169-175.

Oct 18 The '1857 Introduction'

Required Readings:

Marcello Musto, 'History, Production and Method in the 1857 Introduction', in idem, ed., Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 3-32.

Karl Marx, Grundrisse ('Introduction'), Penguin 1973, pp. 83-111.

Additional Readings:

Stuart Hall, 'Marx’s notes on method: A "reading" of the "1857 Introduction"', Cultural Studies, Vol. 17, n. 2 (2003), pp. 113-49.

Terrell Carver, 'Commentary', in idem, ed., Karl Marx: Texts on Method, Oxford: Blackwell 1975, pp. 88-158.

Louis Althusser - Étienne Balibar, Reading Capital, Verso 1979.

Oct 25 Capitalism and Earlier Economic Formations

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Grundrisse ('Forms Which Precede Capitalist Production'), pp. 471-513.

Eric Hobsbawm, Introduction to Karl Marx, Pre-Capitalist Economic Formations, International Publishers 1965, pp. 9-65.

Ellen Meiksins Wood, Historical Materialism in 'Forms Which Precede Capitalist Production' , in Marcello Musto, ed., Karl Marx's Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 79-92.

Karl Marx, A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy (Chapter I: 'The Commodity').

Additional Readings:

Ellen Meiksins Wood, Democracy Against Capitalism, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1995 ('Introduction' and Chapter 1: 'The Separation of the 'Economic' and the 'Political' in Capitalism), pp. 1-48.

Vv. Aa., 'Dissemination and Reception of the Grundrisse in the World',Marcello Musto, ed., Karl Marx's Grundrisse: Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy (Chapters 12, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 23, 24 and 25).

G. A. Cohen, Karl Marx's Theory of History, Princeton University Press 1978.

Nov 1 From the Grundrisse to Capital. I

Required Readings:

Roman Rosdolsky, The Making of Marx’s Capital, Pluto 1977 (Chapters 1 and 2).

Joseph O'Malley - Keith Algozin, ed., Rubel on Karl Marx: Five Essays, Cambridge University Press 1981.

Moishe Postone, Time, Labor, and Social Domination, Cambridge University Press 1993 (Chapters 1: 'Rethinking Marx's Critique of Capitalism' and 10: 'Concluding Considerations'), pp. 3-42 and 385-399.

Additional Readings:

Enrique Dussel, 'The Discovery of the Category of Surplus Value', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 66-78.

Allen Oakley, The Making of Marx’s Critical Theory, Routledge 1983.

Vytalij Vygoskij, The Story of a Great Discovery: How Karl Marx Wrote 'Capital', Verlag der Wirthschaft 1973.

Nov 8 From the Grundrisse to Capital. II

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I ('Preface to the First Edition'; and 'Postface to the French Edition'), pp. 89-93, 105.

Moishe Postone, "Rethinking Capital in Light of the Grundrisse", in M. Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy, pp. 120-137.

Michael Lebowitz, Beyond Capital, Palgrave 2003 (Chapter 3: 'The Missing Book on Wage-Labour'), pp. 27-50.

Kevin Anderson, Marx at the Margins, University of Chicago Press 2010 (Chapter 5: From the Grundrisse to Capital: Multilinear Themes), pp. 151-195.

Kevin Anderson, “The Unknown Marx’s Capital, volume I: The French Edition of 1872-75, 100 Years later”, in Review of Radical Political Economy, Vol. 15, n.4 (1983), pp. 71-80.

Additional Readings:

Allen Oakley, Marx’s Critique of Political Economy. Intellectual Sources and Evolution. Volume II: 1861 to 1863, Routledge 1985.

Enrique Dussel, Towards an unknown Marx: A Commentary on the Manuscritps of 1861-1863, Routledge 2001.

Ernest Mandel, 'Introduction', in Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I, pp. 11-86.

Ben Fine - Alfredo Saad-Filho, Marx's Capital, Pluto Press 2010.

David Harvey, The Limits to Capital, London: Verso 2006 (Chapter 1: 'Commodities, Values and Class Relation'), pp. 1-38.

Nov 15 Labour and Capital in the Unpublished 'Chapter VI' of 1863- 1864

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I ('Appendix: Results of the Immediate Process of Production'), pp. 948-1084.

Additional Readings:

Ernest Mandel, 'Appendix: Results of the Immediate Process of Production: Introduction', in Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I, pp. 943-947.

Nov 22 Marx's Conception of Socialism in Capital and its Preparatory Manuscripts

Required Readings:

Karl Marx, Grundrisse ('The Fragments on Machines'), Penguin 1973, pp. 690-712.

Karl Marx, Capital, Volume I (Chapters I, section 4: 'The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secret Thereof'; 10: 'The Working Day', section 5 'The Struggle for a Normal Working Day. Laws for the Compulsory Extension of the Working Day, from the Middle of the Fourteenth to the End of the Seventeenth Century'; and 13: 'Co-operation'), pp. 163-177, 375-389, 439-454.

Iring Fetscher, 'Emancipated Individuals in an Emancipated Society: Marx's Sketch of Post-Capitalist Society in the Grundrisse', in Marcello Musto (ed.), Karl Marx’s Grundrisse. Foundations of the Critique of Political Economy 150 Years Later, pp. 107-119.

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'The Failure of Twentieth-Century Socialism and Marx’s Continuing Relevance', Socialism and Democracy, Vol. 24, n. 3 (2010), pp. 23-45.

Paresh Chattopadhyay, 'Passage to Socialism: The Dialectic of Progress in Marx', Historical Materialism, Vol. 14, n.3 (2006), pp. 45-84.

Roman Rosdolsky, The Making of Marx’s Capital, Pluto 1977 (Chapters XXVIII and XXIX).

Michael Lebowitz, Beyond Capital, Palgrave 2003 (Chapter 11: 'From Capital to the Collective Worker'), pp. 197-210.

Additional Readings:

Karl Marx, Critique of the Gotha Programme

Karl Marx, 'Letter to Vera Zasulich' (including the drafts) [1881], in MECW 24.

Daniel Bensaid, Marx for Our Times, Verso 2002.

Isaak Illich Rubin, Essays on Marx’s Theory of Value, Black & Red 1972.

Nov 29 Engels’ editorial activity on Capital vol. II and vol. III

Friedrich Engels, “Preface” to Capital vol. II.

Friedrich Engels, “Preface” to Capital vol. III.

Karl Marx, Capital, vol. III (Part III “The Law of the Tendency of the Rate of the Profit to Fall”).

Michael Heinrich, "Engels’ Edition of the Third Volume of Capital and Marx’s Original Manuscript", in Science & Society, Vol. 60, n. 4, (Winter 1996-1997), 452-466.

Michael Heinrich, Das Kapital. Kritik der politischen Ökonomie. Dritter Band (review), in Historical Materialism, Vol. 15 (2007), pp. 195-210.

Regina Roth, “Karl Marx’s Original Manuscripts in the Marx-Engels-Gesamtausgabe (MEGA): Another View on Capital”, in R.Bellofiore-R.Fineschi, Re-reading Marx, Palgrave: 2009.

Michael Heinrich,"Reconstuction or Deconstruction? Methodological Controversies about Value and Capital and New Insights from the Critical Edition”, in R.Bellofiore-R.Fineschi, Re-reading Marx, Palgrave: 2009.

Dec 5 (Monday) Why Could Marx Not Complete Capital ?

Special Seminar with the participation of Michael Krätke (Chair of the Department of Political Economy at Lancaster University - Britain)

February 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: Alberto Hurtado University

Alberto Hurtado University

La Democracia y su Crisis

2013

Departamento de Filosofia

Diplomado Filosofia Política Contemporánea

Universidad Alberto Hurtado

Profesor: Marcello Musto

Sala K-54, Almirante Barroso 10, 5to piso

Periodo: Martes 19:00 – 21:00

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

I. Descripción y objetivos del curso

En este curso serán examinadas algunas de las principales concepciones de democracia en la edad moderna y contemporánea. Su objetivo fundamental, siguiendo un enfoque interdisciplinario, es ofrecer un panorama general de la elaboración de este concepto en el pensamiento filosófico-político occidental. En particular, el tema que guiará el curso será la crisis de la democracia, o sea un ahondamiento sobre los factores - económicos, sociales y políticos - que, en distintas épocas y sociedades (en el Siglo XVI como en el Siglo XX; y en Europa como en Estados Unidos o en Rusia), han determinado la crisis de los modelos democráticos existentes y el comienzo de nuevas temporadas políticas.

“¿En qué consiste la democracia?”. “¿Cuales son las más importantes distinciones entre la teoría clásica, medieval y moderna de democracia?”. “¿Cuando un sistema político puede ser definido como verdaderamente democrático?”. “¿Y cuales son las principales teorías de democracia que se han confrontado en el Siglo XX y que siguen siendo actuales para resolver los problemas de nuestra sociedad contemporánea?”. Serán estas las preguntas a las cuales, con el auxilio de escritos fundamentales del pensamiento filosófico-político moderno y contemporáneo, se dará respuesta en el curso.

En sus primeras cinco semanas, las lecturas se concentraran sobre la concepción de democracia surgida con el aparecer del Estado moderno. La relación entre religión y política, el 'derecho de resistencia' y la tradición iusnaturalistas (sobre todo en las elaboraciones de Althusius, de Hobbes y de Spinoza) representaran el focus central de las clases. La parte central del curso será dedicada a las origines de la concepción liberal de democracia (en particular Locke, Montesquieu, Kant, Constant y Tocqueville) y también a los dos eventos más importantes del Siglo XVIII: el Iluminismo y la Revolución Francesa (Rousseau y Robespierre).

Por fin, en las últimas cuatro semanas, se examinaran las mayores críticas a la concepción de democracia liberal: el socialismo en Europa (Marx y la Asociación Internacional de Trabajadores) y Rusia (Lenin y la Revolución Soviética), la Teoría de las Elites (Mosca, Pareto, Michels y sus continuadores en Estados Unidos) y el Nazi-fascismo (las teorías de Schmitt).

II. Evaluación

El curso cuenta con 16 sesiones que consistirán en exposiciones a cargo de los profesores en torno a un texto previamente asignado. Los textos asignados deben ser leídos con anterioridad y se espera la participación activa de los alumnos.

La principal evaluación del curso consistirá en un ensayo final (entre 3.000 y 4.000 palabras). El tema debe ajustarse al marco de discusión del curso y ser consensuado previamente con los profesores. El ensayo tendrá un valor de 60% respecto a la nota final del curso y deberá ser entregado vía email el día 1° de Diciembre. El restante 40% consistirá en participación a las clases (20%) y en un pequeño ejercicio de reflexión en torno a los temas tratados en clases que se realizará el día 12 de Noviembre (20%).

Participación

20%

Ejercicio de reflexión

20%

Ensayo final

60%

Programa de Clases y lecturas

Julio 30 Introducción al Curso: El concepto de democracia en la época moderna

Agosto 6 Democracia según Protestantes y Monarcómacos

Stephen Junius Brutus, Vindiciae contra Tyrannos: Del poder legítimo del príncipe sobre el pueblo y el pueblo sobre el príncipe [1579], primer capitulo.

http://www.amazon.es/Vindiciae-contra-Tyrannos-leg%C3%ADtimo-Pensamiento/dp/8430947124

Agosto 13 Democracia como Consociatio Universalis

Johannes Althusius, La Política [1603], capítulos I, XVIII-XX, XXXVIII.

http://www.intercodex.com/libros/la-politica-metodicamente-concebida-e-ilustrada-con-ejemplos-sagrados-y-profanos/9788425908606/

Agosto 20 Democracia y Iusnaturalismo

Thomas Hobbes, De Cive [1651], capitulo X.

Agosto 27 Spinoza o de la democracia como libertad

Baruch Spinoza, Tratado teológica-político [1670], capitulo XVI.

Septiembre 3 Las origines de los principios liberales modernos

John Locke, Segundo tratado sobre el gobierno civil [1689], capítulos 9-11, 18.

https://sociologia1unpsjb.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/locke-seleccion-segundo-tratado.pdf

Septiembre 10 Democracia como separación de poderes

John Montesquieu, El espíritu de las leyes [1748,] libros 1 y 3.

Septiembre 24 Democracia como soberanía popular

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, El contrato social [1762], libro III.

Octubre 1 La revolución francesa y el gobierno popular

Maximilien Robespierre, Sobre los principios de moral política [1794].

http://www.google.cl/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCwQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.omegalfa.es%2Fdownloadfile.php%3Ffile%3Dlibros%2Fsobre-los-principios-de-moral-politica.pdf&ei=MOzVUbP-GOjKiwLMmoCIAw&usg=AFQjCNHPCL15o0yx4mi0ix3Bw03Ec8IO4w&sig2=mCATiGLAOQQH-DURQfvjVQ&bvm=bv.48705608,d.cGE

Octubre 8 Kant y el Estado de derecho público

Immanuel Kant, La paz perpetua [1795].

http://www.biblioteca.org.ar/libros/89929.pdf

Octubre 15 Perfiles del liberalismo

Benjamin Constant, De la libertad de los antiguos comparada con la de los modernos [1819].

Octubre 22 El modelo de democracia americana

Alexis de Tocqueville, La democracia en América [1835-40], Libro II, capitulos 5-6.

Octubre 29 Democracia como autogobierno de los productores

Karl Marx, La guerra civil en Francia [1871], capitulo 3.

http://www.marxists.org/espanol/m-e/1870s/gcfran/guer.htm#s3

Karl Marx, Critica del programa de Gotha [1875].

http://www.marxists.org/espanol/m-e/1870s/gotha/gothai.htm

Noviembre 5 Leninismo y dictadura del proletariado

Vladimir Ilic Lenin, El estado y la revolucion [1917], capitulos 1 y 5.

http://www.marxists.org/espanol/lenin/obras/1910s/estyrev/

Noviembre 12 El poder de las Elites

Gaetano Mosca, Elementos de ciencia política [1895], capitulo II.

http://americo.usal.es/iberoame/sites/default/files/Laclasepolitica.pdf

Joseph Schumpeter, Capitalismo, socialismo y democracia [1942], capitulo XXII.

Noviembre 19 Soberanía y Estado de excepción

Carl Schmitt, El concepto de lo político [1932].

http://www.laeditorialvirtual.com.ar/pages/CarlSchmitt/CarlSchmitt_ElConceptoDeLoPolitico.htm

Lecturas recomendadas :

Böckenfórde, E.W. Estudios sobre el Estado de Derecho y la Democracia. Madrid: Trotta, 2000.

Dahl, R. La democracia y sus críticos, Barcelona: Paidós, 1993.

Lijphart, A. Modelos de democracia, Barcelona: Ariel, 2000.

Sartori, G. “Democracia”. Elementos de Teoría Política, Madrid: Alianza Universal Textos, 1992.

Macpherson, C.B. La democracia liberal y su época, Madrid: Alianza, 1987.

Held, D. Modelos de democracia, Madrid: Alianza, 1991.

Touraine, A., ¿Qué es la democracia?, Buenos Aires: FCE, 1995.

January 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: Central University

Central University

La Globalización

(Nuevo orden social y su vínculo con los sectores sociales )

2013

Magister: Acción Social en Escenarios Latino Americanos Complejos. Visiones Multidisciplinarias Facultad de Ciencias Socialies Universidad Central.

 

Profesor: Marcello Musto

Periodo: martes16:00 – 19:00

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Programa de Clases y lecturas

Abril 23 Introduccion al Curso

Abril 30 Globalización: pasado y presente

Mayo 7 Una mapa de los problemas

Mayo 14 Las instituciones de la Globalización

Mayo 28 La economia globalizada

Junio 4 Globalización y precariedadlaboral

Junio 11 Desarrollo o decrescimiento?

 Junio 18 Globalización y pobreza

Junio 25 El debate sobre el destino del E stado - nación

Julio2 Globalización como occidentalizacion

Julio 9 Apologeticos y criticos

Julio 16 Los varios rostros del anti-globalismo

Julio 23 Trabajo Social, cuestion social y globalizacion

Julio 30 Globalizacion: tensiones y desafiospara el Trabajo Social

Agosto 6 Consideraciones Finales

January 2010

Additional info
  • University Name: Nanjing University

The Formation of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy:

From 1843 to the Grundrisse

Marcello Musto

Nanjing University

30 July – 5 August 2010

3 Hours Lectures and Supervision

Fri 30

Lecture 1: Different Marxes, Different Marxisms: The Odyssey of the Publication of Marx’s Oeuvre

Mon 2

Lecture 2: The Early Marx: From University Life to the Manuscripts and Notebooks of Paris (1835 – 1844)

Tue 3

Lecture 3: On “The German Ideology” and the Materialist conception of History (1845 – 1849)

Wed 4

Lecture 4: The Formation of Marx’s Critique of Political Economy: From the “London Notebooks” to the “Grundrisse” (1850 – 1858)

Thu 5

Lecture 5: Karl Marx’s “Grundrisse”: Dissemination and Reception in the World

January 2010